Category Archives: memorial

New Hampshire Holocaust Memorial (Nashua, NH)

Date Visited: March 5, 2016

Location: Rotary Common Park , 315 Main Street , Nashua, NH

Hours: Open every day,  24 hours day

Parking:  Parking is limited.  There are about half a dozen spots in the lot for the memorial.  There is ample parking across the street at the strip mall.

New Hampshire Holocaust Memorial

Dedicated on June 1, 2014, the New Hampshire Holocaust Memorial is a thought provoking exhibit located off busy Main St in Nashua, New Hampshire, next to the Rotary Common Park.

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Designed by John Weidman, the memorial is a somber reminder to never forget.  The memorial does not have any religious symbols nor does it represent one particular race, nation or religion.  This was done purposefully.  The intent is for everyone of any background to be able to empathize with the victims, regardless of your own beliefs or lack thereof.     According to the website for the memorial, the design was inspired “by the belief that to empathize with those who endured the horrors of the Holocaust, one must – on some small level – experience a concentration camp itself.”  The memorial accomplishes this.

The railroad track used for the memorial is an actual railroad track that was donated by PanAm Railway.

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There are several benches and monuments scattered around the area with quotes, phrases and names of those who sacrificed so that others may live as well as reminders of the war on children and homosexuals.  You may notice the rocks on top of some of the memorials.

It was early in the morning and there were a lot of shadows as it was a cloudless, sunny day.  I did my best to avoid casting shadows.

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The main part of the memorial are the six engraved granite walls that encircle a brick column with a black granite cube.  Each of the walls has a name for the six concentration camps (Auschwitz, Sobibor, Treblinka, Majdanek, Belzec and Chelmno).  Each of the granite walls have barbed wire and steel on them.

The black granite cube is meant to show that we are all connected through space and time while making us pause and reflect.

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This is an important memorial and reminder, especially during these difficult times.

 

 

 

 

 


Bronstein Park (Manchester, NH)

Date Visited: February 27, 2016

Location: Beech St, Manchester, New Hampshire (with access points on Union, St, Amherst St and Hanover St)

Cost: Free to the public

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Although a statue that is dedicated to the veterans of the Spanish American War, the Boxer Rebellion and the Phillipine-American War, Bronstein Park celebrates a hero from another war.

Although “The Hiker” stands prominently at the street entrance to the park, Bronstein Park (formerly known as Hanover Square) is actually named after a corpsman who died in World War II; Dr. Ben Richard Bronstein, the first Manchester, New Hampshire, resident to die during the war.  Dr Bronstein’s brother, Maurice Bronstein, donated the memorial to the park in 1990.

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The inscription on the memorial is hard to read in some parts.  It states:

“in memory of
Dr. BEN RICHARD BRONSTEIN,
LIEUTENANT, MEDICAL CORPS,
aboard the destroyer
U.S.S. Jacob Jones
Lost in Action, February 28, 1942
First Naval Officer
From the State of New Hampshire
To have Sacrificed his life
in the fulfillment of his duty
in World War II.

Another memorial pays tribute to Dr. Bronstein’s brother, Stephen Max Bronstein, who also served during the war.

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“The Hiker” was originally sculpted by Theo Alice Ruggles Kitson in 1906.  The original statue was made for the University of Minnesota.  However, 50 copies were made of her statue and were distributed all over America.  Manchester, New Hampshire was the recipient of one of the copies of her statue.  The statue is made of bronze on a base of granite, of course.

The name “hiker” was a moniker the American soldiers in the Spanish American War and Philippine-American War gave themselves because of the long hikes they took in the jungle.  Kitson said the hiker, “depicts a hero stripped of his parade uniform and shown as a soldier reacting to the challenges of the battlefield.”

Leonard Sefing, Jr., a Spanish-American War veteran, was the model for the statue.

A close inspection of the statue shows a weary soldier clad in civilian type apparel.

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An American flag stands in front of the memorial for Dr. Ben Bronstein.

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One strange thing I noticed is a warning posted that prohibits people from hanging out at the park during school hours.  So that is something to bear in mind if you do visit.  I’m not sure why this restriction is in place.  I can only imagine you would be the talk of the town in prison if you ever got convicted of it “Don’t mess with that guy.  He’s in here for loitering.” (I know it’s probably just a fine)

Below are some additional photos of the park from different angles.

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Anne Sullivan Memorial (Feeding Hills/Agawam, MA)

Dates Visited: July 11, 2015 and August 22, 2015

Parking: there is a parking lot located next to the memorial with over a dozen or so parking spaces.  There are also parking lots and off street parking nearby.

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Although she is known more for her success as a teacher and most notably working with Hellen Keller in Tuscumbia, Alabama, and Boston, Massachusetts, Anne Sullivan is actually a product of Feeding Hills (a sub section of Agawam), Massachusetts.

I especially like how the trees still have leaves and the flowers are in bloom since I originally took these photos in the summer of last year.  It makes me yearn for the long spring and summer days.

I am never completely satisfied with my photos.  So, I made two trips to this memorial.  My biggest gripe with the first set of photos was there were too many cars and people in the background.  But, even when I went back another day earlier in the daytime there was still a lot of activity.  It is located by a busy intersection so it was unavoidable.  You can see the difference in the shadowing and angle of the sun from my two visits.

Sullivan lost her vision at an early age due to an infectious eye disease.  She would receive a series of treatments which considerably improved her vision while she was a student at Perkins School for the Blind in Boston.  This undoubtedly inspired her to work with other people who were visually impaired and challenged in other ways.

The centerpiece of the park is the monument of Anne Sullivan sitting with Helen Keller. The intensity in her stare is palpable. The sculpture, created by the Romanian-American sculptor Mico Kaufman, captures the moment Anne Sullivan successfully teaches Helen Keller her first word – “water.” The statue was dedicated on June 28, 1992.

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The park is well kept and there are many places to sit.  A gazebo stands off to the side as well.  It would be a peaceful place to relax and unwind, except the fact it is located at a busy intersection.

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There are additional monuments in the park.

This memorial is another tribute to Anne Sullivan’s work with Helen Keller.  The inscription reads, “Anne Sullivan…Teacher of Helen Keller.  Heroic friend of the deaf and blind.  Native of Feeding Hills.”

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This memorial is a tribute to the Agawam Militia who trained on this land during the revolutionary War.  I am always fascinated at how seemingly ordinary places like a busy intersection has so much history and significance.  In fact, the land you are standng on, or the land your house or apartment building was built upon most certainly has a hidden history you are not privy to.

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The trees at the Anne Sullivan memorial Park are very impressive, particularly when they still have their leaves.

The last monument I photographed at the park names the people on the memorial committee.  If you look closely, you may notice the inscription is also written in braille.

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Springfield Museums (Springfield, MA)

Date visited: January 16, 2016

Hours: Tue-Sat 10-5, Sun 11-5, closed Mon

Price:

 

Adults: $18
Seniors: $12
Youth 3–17: $9.50
Children Under 2: Free
Students: $12

Springfield Residents (with valid ID): Free – youth included

There is a parking lot by the science museum entrance with about 50 or so spaces.  There is an overflow parking lot across the street.  Parking is free.

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The museums in Springfield, MA, are not your usual museums.  For one, there are four museums, rather than one.  Secondly, on the grounds of one of the museums is another perhaps bigger attraction, the Dr. Suess National Memorial Garden.

There are four museums are the Springfield Museums.  I spent most of the time at the  Springfield Science Museum

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and the Lyman & Merrie Wood Museum of Springfield History

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The two art and sculpture museums do not allow photography.

The Springfield Science Museum is bigger than it appears on the outside.  It is three floors (a first and second floor with a lower level).  The exhibits range from live animals (mostly fish and other smaller animals such as turtles) to dinosaur bones and artifacts.

There was so much to absorb in those few levels.  But, my two favorite parts of this particular museum had to be the Tyrannosaurus Rex and the demonstration put on by the staff in which the patrons, the children who were visiting, got to find out how fortune teller fish work.

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From the moment you enter the science museum your senses are attracted to all of the interesting items in the main entrance.  The main themes of the museum are the products of the Springfield, MA, area such as Dr. Seuss and Indian Motorcycles which were manufactured in Springfield.

Two former residents of Springfield reside in the museum.

Snowball

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and Jynx

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These animals used to be part of the The Zoo In Forest Park (post about this wonderful park to come in the spring or summer).  When they died, they were stuffed and put on display.

There is a wide variety of fish and other animal life on the lower level.  You have to look closely but the first image is of a shy salmon camouflaged against the rocks.  In fact, many of the animals were shy.

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There were also a variety of toys, art work and fun items for kids of all ages and sizes to enjoy like the skeleton with the Dr. Seuss hat on (note the tie-in to Springfield) and mirrors that make you look smaller and wider, just when I didn’t think I could feel worse about my weight ( :

The second and third levels of the museum have a dinosaur exhibit, planetarium, historical items, models of animals and a variety of other items.

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The historical museum, located across the street from the science museum, is a little smaller but it also has a wide variety of displays.

During my visit, the museum was displaying the Better Angels tribute to the fallen firefighters from September 11, 2001.  The portrait artist who made the display is from nearby East Longmeadow.  The exhibit will be on display until June of this year.

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After seeing this touching tribute, some of the other attractions seem trivial.  There are a variety of old time cars and a fire exhibit in the main area.  There is also an educational play area for children (and adults if you’re inclined).

The Springfield Museums are a great place to visit.  Time seems to go by quickly while you’re there so it’s easy to lose track of time.  But, it is fun for the entire family.


Plymouth Rock (Plymouth, MA)

 

Who would ever think people would travel from all over the country and all over the world just to see a rock?  Yes, a  rock.  This is not just any rock, though.

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The rumored landing spot of the Mayflower, Plymouth Rock is one of the more disappointing yet often visited sites south of Boston, MA.

Despite it’s popularity, the rock at Plymouth Rock is not the actual rock the Mayflower struck.  In fact, the rock has been said to have been moved at least three different times and the rock has been said to have been damaged several times, breaking in half at one point.  Not only that, but the passengers of the Mayflower initially landed in Provincetown in Cape Cod.

While the rock itself probably isn’t the actual rock the Mayflower struck upon its landing and it’s not the actual initial landing spot of the Pilgrims, it is symbolic of the voyage the persistence of the people who landed there.

Located in walking distance of the Mayflower II, the rock is located at the bottom of a pit and protected by a fence.

The rock is located in a structure with pillar columns.

The harbor is usually teaming with activity.

There is also a monument located across the street from Plymouth Rock.  The Pilgrim Mother was donated in 1921 to celebrate the Tercentenary of the Mayflower landing by the Daughters of the American Revolution.

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I met Bo while I was visiting the memorial.

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and these two cuties

 


Salem Witch Trials Memorial (Salem, MA)

In the midst of half drunk college pranksters, families on day trips, tourists dressed in their Halloween costume of choice and an assortment of other revelers stands a somber memorial to the victims of the Salem witch trials.

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Directly across from shops that hawk kitschy tourists souvenirs and “haunted houses” designed to spook people of all ages, is a memorial that commemorates a dark part of American history.  Without this dark time, there would be no kitschy souvenirs or haunted houses.

Dedicated in 1992, the Salem Witch Trials TerCentenary, the Salem Witch Trials Memorial, pays tribute to the 20 victims of the hysteria.

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Twenty benches, representing each of the 20 victims, stretch out from the stone wall.  Each bench or slab has each victim etched into it with the date of their death.  Often times, people will leave stones, coins, flowers, notes and other little gifts or mementos behind.
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At the entrance on the ground are snippets of the quotes from some of the victims just before their deaths.

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Of course, trials has a double meaning and it is a fitting use of the term.

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Witch Trial Memorial (Danvers, MA)

When most people think of the witch hysteria that gripped the New England colonies in 1692 and 1693, they are likely to think it began and took place exclusively in Salem.  However, although they are known as the Salem Witch Trials and Salem largely takes the infamy of the witch hunt, Salem does not hold that infamous title.

Salem Village, now known as Danvers, has the infamous distinction of being the beginning of the Salem witch hysteria.  It is here in Danvers, Massachusetts, where a somber memorial stands as a constant reminder to remember this past and to never let something like this happen again.

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Erected in May, 1992, the monuments lists the 20 people who were executed during the witch trials.

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Each slab lists a quote of innocence from each victim.

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The rays spilling in from the top of the memorial was a nice touch.

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Some of the more poignant quotes listed on the wall are:

“Well!  burn me or hang me.  I will stand in the truth of Christ…” – George Jacobs, Sr

“Amen. Amen.  A false tongue will never make a guilty person.” – Susannah Martin

The memorial also has a sculpture of “The Book Of Life” on top of a table that has a tribute etched in the base.

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Attached to each side of the book are chains.  Stark reminders of the pain they endured.

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Someone left a flower at the memorial, a common occurrence at this memorial, particularly during this time of the year.

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The memorial site has many pretty views to photograph from a variety of angles and the foliage added a nice touch.  The foliage gave a serene feeling in contrast to the moving memorial.

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In front of the memorial, there is monument that lists the generous donors who made the memorial possible.  You may notice the red door on the house in the background.  This is not unusual for the area.  The houses in Danvers and the surrounding area were beautiful in their understated uniqueness and pretty yet rustic nature.

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A sign, inconspicuously posted by the side of the road explains the origins and history of the site and surrounding area as well as the meaning behind the memorial.

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