Category Archives: art

Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway Part II (Boston, MA)

Dates Of Visits: August 12, 13, 18, 19, 2018

Location: Various locations in Boston, MA

Hours: Open daily, 7 a.m. until 11 p.m.

Cost: Free

Parking: there is some street parking available at some parts of the Greenway (particularly on Atlantic Ave) and several parking garages in the area.  There are also several MBTA train stations within walking distance to the Greenway such as South Station

Trail Size/Difficulty: 15 acres, 1.5 miles/easy

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Highlights: flowers,scenic,dog friendly, historic

Websites: Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway

Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway Overview

Good Historical Overview Of The Greenway Project

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In my first blog post of the Rose Kennedy Greenway, I posted photos of some of the beautiful flowers and plants on the Greenway.  In this installment, I will include photos of the beautiful artwork on the Greenway.

There are several art exhibits on the Greenway.  I figured I would post them in the order they appear on the Greenway.

The first part of the Greenway in this post is at Chinatown near the Lincoln Street Triangle.

Year Of The Dog by Rosa Puno is a nod to the current year of the dog in the Chinese zodiac calendar.  The exhibit has spinning cube-like blocks made of wood on a steel structure that has Chinese words with their translations and excerpts from people in the neighborhood that Rosa collected from people in the neighborhood.

This part of the Greenway has other attractions such as the human-made waterfall and stream and a sitting area where people can spend time together, play games or just play in the water.  Ahh, to  be young again.

The next work of art is a mural that is painted on a building that sits on Atlantic Ave.  The building this mural is changed annually.  Each year, usually in the spring, a new mural is painted by a different artist.

The 70’x76′ mural on the building at Dewey Square is called Carving Out Fresh Options.  It was painted by Shara Hughes.

I was fortunate enough to see the artist working on her mural while I was walking to work in May.

And, of course, the finished product.  During the summer, people lay out on towels or on chairs on the lawn in front of the Greenway which can make photographing it without obstructions challenging.

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There also are historical markers on the Greenway.  Two remnants of the old raised Central Artery highway that once carried traffic over this area.

One of the beams from the original Central Artery is located the building with the mural above.  It is located on Congress and Purchase Streets which is easy to remember by the axiom “people purchase congress.”  Sad but true.  It is easy to miss as I have probably walked past it hundreds of times but never gave it a second thought until I wrote this post.

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A plaque on the beam gives a brief history of the construction of the Central Artery project (built between 1951 and 1959) and fun facts (well they’re facts) such as the number of vehicles which used the highway when it was first built (75,000 vehicles) to the number of vehicles that used it in 1990 when the “Big Dig” began to be planned (200,000 vehicles).

There is another beam from the Central Artery located on Surface Road located on the edge of Faneuil Hall.

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Rumor has it there may be another one on Clinton Street.  But, I couldn’t find it.

Located across from the first steel beam from the Central Artery is Balancing Act by Aakash Nihalani.

The display is broken into two works, Balancing Act I and Balancing Act II.

Balancing Act I represents a tower of six cubes which appear to fall over as the middle one is pulled out of alignment.

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Balancing Act II  shows blocks which are precariously piled up and appear to be ready to collapse.  I think we all can related to this apt description of our everyday lives.

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The works almost seem unreal.  It’s as though they were a mirage or photo shopped into the photo (I swear I didn’t).  Akash just knows how to use colors and  materials.

Way Of The Woods by Daniel Ibanez and Margen-Lab is a tribute to the North American landscapes.  The nine logs are said to transform into contemporary interpretations of these raw natural materials.

The next work of art is an illuminated tunnel-like structure made by Luftwerk called Transition.

It looks a lot more impressive during the evening hours.

Harbor Fog by Ross MIller is an interactive sculpture.  As a person or body comes closer to it it makes noises and generates fog.

The next work of art located on the Greenway is called GLOW.  GLOW is a collection of old neon signs that once illuminated the Massachusetts skies.  The signs are the collection of Lynn and Dave Waller.  Each sign is erected on a concrete block with the name of the city or town it once stood.  The signs are illuminated all day and night, during park hours.  But, as you can see by the photos, they look much prettier during the evening.

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The Siesta Motel on Route 1 North, Saugus, MA, circa 1950 sign looks cool enough during the day, particularly during an overcast day.

But, it looks much nicer during the evening.

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Unfortunately, the lights for the Fontaine’s Restaurant, VFE Parkway, West Roxbury, MA, circa 1952  (I actually ate breakfast there once…after the neon sign was installed wise acres) were not working when I went to visit it during the day and evening.

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European Restaurant, 218 Hanover Street, Boston, 1970.

The remaining signs were all taken during the evening hours to highlight their colorful artwork.

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Bay State Auto Spring, 83 Hampden St, Roxbury, MA, circa 1965

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The neon sign for Cycle Center, Natick, MA, 1956 is one of my favorites.  It lights up and changes colors as the rider pedals.

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General Electric Radio, 240 Blue Hill Ave, Roxbury, MA, circa 1925

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Flying Yankee Restaurant, Route 20 and Route 12, Auburn, MA, circa 1953.

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State Line Potato Chips, Route 20, Wilbraham, MA, c. 1950s

There is also a memorial to the victims of the Armenian genocide as well as the Armenian immigrants and immigrants of all backgrounds that came to the United States and settled in the Boston area.

The Armenian Heritage Park has a maze for people to walk that leads a fountain at the center of the circular path.  Words like science and commerce have been etched in the paths. A plaque near a bench at the park states the park is dedicated to those suffered to preserve the Armenian heritage.

The Abstract Sculpture honors the victims of the Armenian genocide and victims of all genocides as well as our open shores.

The inscription on the sculpture reads:

“Boston and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts have offered hope and refuge for immigrants seeking to begin new lives. The park is a gift to the people of the Commonwealth and the City of Boston from the Armenian-American community of Massachusetts. This sculpture is offered in honor of the one and one half million victims of the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923. May it stand in remembrance of all genocides that have followed, and celebrate the diversity of the communities that have re-formed in the safety of these shores.”

There is also a statue dedicated to Tony DeMarco.  Who is Tony DeMarco?  Don’t say that too close to the North End of Boston.

Tony DeMarco is a former World Welterweight Champion who grew up in the North End section of Boston, MA.  Despite winning the Welterweight title, the Sicilian born boxer was best known for his slug fests with Carmen Basilio.  He would lose both fights but fought valiantly in both matches.

Gelato, a 4 month old mixed breed dog, also enjoyed the art work on the Greenway.

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Thank you all for stopping by and reading.  In my upcoming third and final installment of the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway, I will be focusing on some of the entertainment on the Greenway!

Sometimes it seems like your phone’s camera takes better photos then your camera, especially during the evening when you don’t have your tripod.  Click on the link below to access my Facebook page and view more night time photos and videos from the Greenway.  And give the page a “like” while you’re at it!

New England Nomad on Facebook


Legal Graffiti Wall (Beverly, MA)

Date Of Visit: July 14, 2018

Location: McPherson St., Beverly MA (entrance is located on West Federal St) (about 30 minutes northeast of Boston. MA)

Hours: open daily sunrise to sunset

Cost: Free

Handicapped Accessible: No

Dog Friendly: Yes

Highlights: legal graffiti wall in Beverly, MA

Fun Facts:

  • this “permission wall” is one of the few legal graffiti walls in MA
  • the wall has been accessible to artists since 1995
  • the wall has 500 feet of space for graffiti

Website: Legal Graffiti Wall Facebook Page

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Tucked behind an industrial building in Beverly, MA, is a haven for graffiti artists of all skill levels and artistic styles.

The 500 foot wall behind the Clemenzi Industrial building has some very creative art from a variety of artists.

Stylized lettering designs are one of the more popular works on the wall.

Of course, there is a tribute to the home sports team.

As well as the artists renditions of popular television characters.

There were two graffiti artists at the wall when I arrived.

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If you do go, don’t do what I did and cross the railroad tracks on McPherson (for obvious reasons). But, you can see some nice views of the art from the parking lot. Police and rail workers are said to patrol the area to ensure no one crosses the tracks . The main entrance is on West Federal St at the intersection just before or after the graffiti wall depending upon which direction you are coming from. There is also an entrance on West Dayne St.

One of the great things about the graffiti wall is that you can continually go back and see different works of art. The wall is cleaned and the graffiti is erased on a regular basis to make room for new works. I am sure I will be making more visits out there to view the new graffiti. Maybe I’ll bring a few spray paint cans with me!

Below is a video of a walk through of the graffiti wall.


Underground At Ink Block (Boston, MA)

Date Of Visit: July 12, 2018

Location: 90 Traveler St, Boston, MA

Hours: Accessible all day except between the hours of 1 a.m. and 5 a.m.

Cost: Free

Parking: There are 175 parking spots (parking at Underground Ink is not free) and additional street parking and parking garages nearby

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Website: Underground At Ink Block

Highlights: art, bar, dog park, scenic

Fun Facts:

  • there is over 100,000 square feet of wall art at Underground Ink
  • the park is located under I-93 (Interstate 93)

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Boston’s newest hot spot doesn’t have a cover charge nor does it have a dress code.  It doesn’t even have a roof.  Well, it sort of does.

Located under the I-93 overpass, Underground Ink Block blends art, entertainment and beauty in a most unlikely place.

One of the more beautiful aspects of the park are the murals.

There are  several murals at the park.  This mural, which appears on the wall at the entrance to the park, was painted by Vyal Reyes.

 

There is a large group of murals by the parking area.

This particular mural was painted by Watts, California native Upendo Taylor.

 

Three artists worked on this mural which is part of a group of three murals that share one wall.  Problak Don Rimx and Marka27 all collaborated to paint this beautiful mural

 

 

New York native Cey Adams painted this lovely mural.

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Nepali artist IMAGINE (Sneha Shrestha) painted this imaginative mural.  Imagine likes to incorporate her native Sanskrit language with modern designs.

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This mural, located under one of the overpasses above, was painted by Percy Fortini-Wright.

You may notice some of the landmarks and symbols associated with the Boston (such as the famous Citgo sign that hovers over the left field wall at Fenway Park) on the right hand corner of the mural.

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This mural, which covers the outermost wall of the area, was painted by Hoxxoh.

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If you get lost at the Underground Ink Block,  just follow the bright lines on the ground.  The colored streaks on the ground lead to the different murals around the park

Underground Ink also an area for hosting events, such as yoga, or to stop by and have a game of ring toss and toss back a few beverages with friends.

There are also some pretty views at the park (at least if you look in the opposite direction of the busy intersection at the entrance)

 

 

But, the highlight for many of us has to be the dog park.  Tucked away in the back of the parking area, the dog park has lots of room for dogs and humans to play.

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During my visit. there was a “Hound Around” event for dogs.  The event, which was sponsored by Capital One at Ink Block, was hosted by The Urban Hound.

The park is big enough for the dogs to roam around in and play without being too crowded.

There were pools for the dogs to cool down or get a quick drink.  I know.  Gross. But, hey, they’re dogs.  They don’t care!  Some dogs preferred to just drink from the hose.

 

There was a pretty big turnout and everyone played nice.

Oprah, a 3 and a half year old Boston Terrier, can really jump!  She was jumping up for her toy in this photo.

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Simba, a 2 year old Chow Chow, looks like a fluffy teddy bear.

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Besties Zoey, a 4 year old Black Lab, and Jovie, a 2 year old Golden Doodle, looked adorable after a dip in the pool.

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Junior, a 6 year old Collie mix, has beautiful markings.

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Yoshi, a 2 year old mix rescue dog, had fun playing with his ball.

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Badger, a 3 and a half year old Aussie Terrier mix, waiting patiently for his dad to throw his toy.

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Bella, a 7 year old Boxer, took a break to watch the other dogs play.

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Kylie, a 6 year old Morkie (Maltese and Yorkie mix) was all smiles at the park.

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As I left the dog park, I met Nikki.  Nikki is a super talented designer and creator of dog bandannas and accessories.  Check out her website: Just Add Dogs.

If you and Fido missed out on this Hound Around event, don’t worry.  There will be another one Thursday, Aug. 9 from 6:30 to 7:30 at the Underground Ink Art Block.

Cute dogs were not the only animals I saw at the Underground Ink Block.  I also saw this rabbit having dinner.  As an aside, I have been noticing many more rabbits and other animals who do not typically belong in the city making their way into the city.  I do hope it’s only a trend and not a permanent thing.  After all, the city can be far more dangerous than the wild!

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Thank you for sharing another adventure with me!


10th Annual Salem Arts Festival – Part III (Salem, MA)

Dates Of Event: June 1-3, 2018 (event usually takes place the first weekend in June)

Location: Front St, Old Town Hall, Salem, MA

Cost: Free

Parking: Street parking, which is limited during festivals, costs .75 an hour (4 hour limit) and there are several parking lots and garages.  You can find more information about parking in Salem here.

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Location: Artist’s Row, Salem, MA

Fun Facts:

  • Salem (in Hebrew) means “peace”
  • If you do visit (and shop) in Salem, don’t forget your re-usable shopping bag (they ditched plastic bags earlier this year)

Related Posts: 10th Annual Salem Arts Festival – Part I

10th Annual Salem Arts Festival – Part II

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What would an arts festival be without…art?

Well,  in addition to the musical artists, acrobats, flamenco dancers and various other entertainers, there was also lots of art on display at the Old Salem Town Hall during the festival.

All of the artists featured at this display, with one exception, were from Massachusetts and overwhelming from Salem or in the Salem MA area.

The exhibit was free of charge and there was lots of different art to entertain even the harshest art critic.  In fact, there was everything from clocks and photographs to glass sculptures and a paper mache work of art in the exhibit.  Much like

This clock called The Slow Procession of Luna was made out of oil, wood and clay.  It was  created by Gardeneer, MA artist Melinda Goodhue.

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Grasshopper Junction, Arizona was painted by Lynn, MA, artist Heather Stewart.

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Salem resident Denny Tentindo painted VWII.  It is an oil on wood painting.

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Remembering Georgie by Heather M Morris of Belmont, MA, is an acrylic on canvas work.

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Urban 3,  a photograph on canvas, was made by Chrissa Markos, a Manchester (MA) resident.

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Urban 1, also by Chrissa Markos is a photograph on canvas.

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The Annunciation is an acrylic on board work of art by Lynn, MA, artist Daniel Parziale

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This creation, made out of recycled magazines by Betsy Silverman, is called Sister Act.

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Dancing With The Stars is an oil painting by Nancy Satin.

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This work, called Dragon: noun, was made out of a dictionary.  It was created by Jacob Crawford.  His work of art won the Deborah Greel Honrary Award

 

Edison & His Children is a digital collage by Edward Morneau.

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Engaged, by Daniel Breslin, was made out of found objects on wood.

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The Controler, by Jack Walsh, is made of found objects.

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Jacob Crawford created Rainbow Chameleon with paint swatches.

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Nathaniel Hare-Thorne was sculpted by Swampscott, MA, resident Diane McAlisterr

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Marie by Taylor Popek is made oout of acrylic yarn and polyfil.

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I love all of the Salem references in this Salem Cat sculpture (you may see the Bewitched statue, Old Town Hall, the Peabody Essex Museum and other attractions on Essex St) and the foliage on the trees puts me in the fall spirit.  This scupture is an acrylic painted ceramic piece by Salem resident Beki Ferrari.

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Salem Derby Cat by Beki Ferrari is another acrylic painted ceramic sculpture.  You may also see other Salem attraction from Derby St (The House of the Seven Gables) on this sculpture.  Of course, I would have to say this was my favorite.

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Through View is an oil painting by Boxford, MA, resident Tom Bailey.

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Emergence  is an encaustic (“hot wax” painting) mixed media work of art by Amesbury, MA. artist Deb E. Goldberg.

Diane McAlister sculpted this work called Bride of Frankenmummy.

 

 

 

 

Crow is a clay sculpture by Billie-Joe Gauley of Salem.

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Girabbit is another clay sculpture by by Billie-Joe Gauley.

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Great Egret by Racket Shreve is a watercolor painting.

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Brit Eating a Salad is an oil on wood painting by Salem artist Amanda Dunham.

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NorEaster is a glass work of art by Matthew Cronin.

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Autumn is another glass sculpture by Matthew Cronin.

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Ipswich artist Jen Boisvert carved sculpted this piece called Figure.

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This untitled work is a mixed media on wood work of art by Sara Ashodian.

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Deb E. Goldberg made this encaustic and mixed media work of art called Departure.

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Ocean V is an acrylic and refined linseed oil painting by Melissa Pasdon of Salem, MA.

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This untitled work is a painted wood sculpture by Heather Stewart.

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Blue Fish  by Elizabeth Visco of Lynnfield, MA, is a Raku (A type of Japanese pottery) stoneware work of art.

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Robert Crooker of Wakefield ,MA, made this acrylic painting.

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There was also fun for those who people and dogs who wanted to cool down and splash their friend or sister.

 

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While I was photographing all of these great works of art, I saw a dog that had similar markings to my mom’s new dog.  So, I knew I had to photograph her.  June (or “Junebug”) is a 15 month old mixed breed dog.

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During my walk back to my car I met Glenna who looked adorable resting on her rock.

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And, proving that I do indeed visit Salem frequently (one of the last times I visited someone say “Hi Nomad”), I saw Cookie who I had I photographed earlier this year and also again during the festival.

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10th Annual Salem Arts Festival – Part II (Salem, MA)

Location: Front St, Old Town Hall, Salem, MA

Dates Of Event: June 1-3, 2018 (event usually takes place the first weekend in June)

Cost: Free

Parking: Street parking, which is limited during festivals, costs .75 an hour (4 hour limit) and there are several parking lots and garages. You can find more information about parking in Salem here.

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Location: Artist’s Row, Salem, MA

Fun Fact: Salem (in Hebrew) means “peace”

Related Post: 10th Annual Salem Arts Festival – Part I

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Murals weren’t the only types of art on display at the Salem Arts Festival.

In addition to the amazing art on display and family friendly activities I highlighted in Part I of this series, there were several bands, dancers and other entertainers who set up on the stairs of the Old Town Hall on Front St.

All of the performers were very talented and entertaining (view the videos below to see for yourself)

All of the performers had some ties to New England, and in many cases the Salem area.

Liz Bills And The Change are from Haverhill, MA (about 40 minutes north of Salem), rocked the alley next tot he Coffee Brewhouse. Great presence and style.

Wellesley (MA) native and Berklee College of Music graduate, Sarah Blacker and the New England Groove Association was another great performer.

She even made a new young fan.

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One of the things I really enjoyed about the performers was the variety of music and entertainment. In fact, I actually heard and enjoyed some music from bands that I never thought I would be into. One of those bands was the Boston-based Outrageous Fortune Trio Jug Band mixed jazz and blues in their repertoire. I particularly enjoyed their version of “Come Together.” He actually used the cane in the photo below as an instrument.

I loved the Emma Sundvik & Hunter Burgamy Jazz Band.

I also had a surprise encounter with a friend from my gym. Anthony (“Antonio”) plays the Flamenco guitar for Boston Flamenco. Anastasia and Anna Maria joined him in his performance.

At the end of their performance, Anastasia gave some of the visitors a lesson in Flamenco dancing.

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The entertainment was not just limited to music, though. One of my favorite forms of entertainment was the dancing of the Salem YMCA Fly Kidz. These kids can dance!

And what would an arts festival in Salem be without a visit from Dark Follies?

Dark Follies incorporates stunts (a straitjacket escape artist), dancers and other magical entertainment into their acts.

The kids loved the Boston Opera Outreach Troupe. It was great seeing little children embracing this music.

If that was not enough, the Aerial Artistry of Baechtold & Abel (and their college understudy) took center stage on Front St. Their acrobatics were so graceful. But, what people may overlook is the strength these acrobats must have to be able to support their own and their partner’s body.

Speaking of Front St, there were “tiny dancers”, or more accurately a tiny stage with real life sized dancers performing.

There were also fairies who blew bubbles, read stories and danced with the children (and a few adults).

There was also a “Poets In The Round” poetry reading event.

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The street performers who you might usually see only during the Halloween season also came out to partake in the festivities and take photos with their fans. Or, just take in the scenes with a, uh….friend. It was like Halloween in June!

Of course, what would an art festival be without dogs?

Rocko looked cool rocking his bee wings with his doting humans.

Igor (the Hairless dog) was one of the more unique dogs I have photographed. You may notice his two different colored eyes.

Below are some videos of the performers from the art festival. Sorry for the “shaky cam” in some of the videos, particularly those taken at the end of the day.

And, believe it or not, there is at least one more installment of photos from the art festival coming soon!


10th Annual Salem Arts Festival – Part I (Salem, MA)

Dates Of Event: June 1-3, 2018 (event usually takes place the first weekend in June)

Cost: Free

Parking: Street parking, which is limited during festivals, costs .75 an hour (4 hour limit) and there are several parking lots and garages.  You can find more information about parking in Salem here.

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Location: Artist’s Row, Salem, MA

Fun Fact: Salem (in Hebrew) means “peace”

Related Post: Artists Row

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The 10th Annual Salem Arts festivals was the place to bee last weekend.

As part of their Bee To Brick awareness campaign, the festival posted colorful bees along Artist Row and Front St.  The purpose of the campaign is to raise awareness of these pollinators as they are crucial to our ecosystem, and, in some areas, in danger of being depleted.  So, the next time you see a black and yellow insect don’t swat it, just shoo it away!

The “bees” were made out of plastic bottles and other recyclable materials.

 

But, the bees were only one highlight of this event. The three day (I attended 2 of the days), was full of performers, arts and crafts and various family friendly events.  The weather was picture perfect with sunny skies for all to enjoy (and I had the burn to prove it).  In fact, there was so much to see and do, I am going to have to post about this festival in parts (probably 3 or 4 parts).  In part I I will focus on some of the events on Artist’s Row.

I arrived early Saturday before all of the events started.  In a matter of hours this path (Artist’s Row – a haven for the artistic and lovers of artistic expression) would be packed with performers, vendors and revelers.

 

Along Artist’s Row, there were lots of events for kids, adults and even dogs to enjoy.  Kids could get wings (part of “bee to brick” theme), give a high five to, by far, the tallest attendee of the festival, Jasper, “King Of The Rag Dolls.”  There were also tables were kids could make hats, draw in a Salem Coloring Book and even make a Happy Father’s day card.

 

There were also vendors set up along the row and on Front St.  One of the vendors I met was the talented and friendly Joey, owner of Salem Pet Photography.

 

This won’t be the last time you see a photo of Joey in my series of blog posts for this festival.

There is so much to see and do in Salem.  But, fear not, if you get lost on Artist’s Row there is a sign post to direct you in the correct direction.

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The main attraction on Artist’s Row was the annual Mural Slam.

An artist or team of artists were given a photo to recreate as a mural.  Just seeing the progression of the murals is amazing.  It is incredible to see just how the recreations are just as good, if not better, than the original photographs.  The deadline for the murals was 8 p.m.on Sunday and I could not stay that long.  I took photos of the murals in their latest stages just before I left.  I will have to go back at some point to view all of the finished murals.  You can find more updated photos from the Mural Slam here.

 

Casey Stanberry, an architect from Cambridge (MA), was tasked with one of the hardest tasks; painting each street, intersection, building and other object from an overhead view of Salem.  The painstaking project took him two full days to complete.

 

“Caw-Caw” was painted by Madison Economides.

 

“Day Dream” was painted by Amanda Beard Garcia and Mariah Leah

 

Bruce Orr, who has worked as an art therapist, art teacher, painter and illustrator, painted this work.

 

Mike Grimaldi worked on this mural

 

Boston based artist Sophy Tuttle painted this beetiful mural.

 

This mural was painted by the Salem Academy Slammers (students from the Salem Academy Charter School in Salem, MA)

 

Kate Holloway painted this mural

 

Dan Belisle, a self taught artist from the North Shore of MA, painted this mural.

 

This “community abstract painting” (visitors could add their own efforts to this work before the actual artist finished it up) called “Geometry” was painted by James Eric Rogers (with help from the community of course)

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Liz Sullivan, who considers herself an “artist turned graffiti writer”, painted this mural.

I also came across a four legged lover of the arts: Rosie, a 17 month old Terrier Hound mix.

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Stay tuned for my Part II from the Salem Arts Festival which will include many of the performance artists on Front St. (and probably a few more dogs)!

 

 


Lady Of Salem – 2018 (Salem, MA)

Dates Of Event: June 1-3 (during Salem Arts Festival)

Location: Throughout Downtown Salem

Parking: Street parking, which is limited during festivals, costs .75 an hour (4 hour limit) and there are several parking lots and garages.  You can find more information about parking in Salem here.

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Highlights: A collection of figureheads displayed throughout downtown Salem

Tip(s): While most of the figureheads are located on Essex St, follow the red historical tour line throughout the city to find the remaining figureheads

Related Post: Lady Of Salem – 2016 (Salem, MA)

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In observation of the Salem Arts Festival, the Salem Historical Society decided to send out the ladies of Salem.

The Ladies Of Salem are a collection of figureheads constructed by a variety of artists.

While these figures have been displayed before (see related post above), when I did photograph these figureheads in the past there weren’t as many on display as theere were this past weekend. Some of them were missing (they had been destroyed or stolen off their mounted displays) and  others looked a little roughed up.  Besides I was in Salem to photograph the Arts Festivals (posts on this event soon).  So, I thought I would photograph all of the figureheads in their current state.  And, much to my delight, they all looked as though they may have been touched up a bit and the were all actually there.  Since they were posted rather high on lamp posts, a ladder or cherry picker would have came in handy.  But it was still fun photographing all of the figureheads.  Plus, it gave me a chance to photograph some dogs along the way.

There appeared to be a few figureheads on display that either were not posted or I may have missed in my earlier visit in 2016.  The tricky thing about looking for these figureheads is there wasn’t a map or website with the locations of the figureheads’ locations.  This made it more difficult but also more fun.

The one tip I was given by the helpful workers at the tourism office is to follow the red line which represents the Salem Heritage Trail and includes many of the famous historical haunts in Salem.  The trail is only about a mile or so and there are lots of fun and interesting things to see along the trail.

More than half of the 21 Ladies of Salem are displayed along the Essex Street Pedestrian Mall. The other figureheads may be found on Derby and Washington streets, as well as one that is posted at Old Town Hall.

The figureheads are put on display from time to time, especially for different events such as the arts festival or the maritime arts festival.

The artists were given a blank canvas on a 33-inch-tall-by-14-inch-wide and 14-inch-deep figurehead molded of a hard yet lightweight fibrous material. Before the mounting board is attached, the figureheads weigh only 7 pounds.

I wanted to take closeups of the figureheads’ faces to show off the details of them.  I also like to think of them as being in deep thought, gazing off to the sea or some other distant place.

Most of the figureheads are dressed or painted to represent the sponsors of the figurehead.  For instance, the figurehead that is sponsored by Essex’s N.Y. Pizza & Deli in the Salem Museum Place Mall (aka Witch City Mall), has a crown and “I Love Pizza” t-shirt on.  You may also notice stickers of bees on the signs of the figureheads.  The bees are part of the “bee proud” awareness promotion for pride month.

Figureheads on ships were said to have strong magical or religious significance.  As you may notice from the photos below, women were largely used as the shapes of the figureheads.  They were supposed to be used to appeal to the ocean gods and spirits and cause these spirits and gods to be stricken by their beauty, enabling the ships to proceed without any interference from these potential evil doers.

The Phoenicians are said to have been the first people to use figureheads, from around 2500 to 539 BC, when they adorned the prows of their oared galleys with wooden carvings that depicted animals, birds, dieties, and serpents.

The Egyptians and Chinese instituted the practice of painting eyes, known as Oculi, on the bows of their vessels, so that they may find their way across the oceans.

Catholic countries, such as Spain, used religious figureheads, such as Jesus Christ and the Virgin Mary, in the hopes that these figureheads would bring them safety and fortune in their voyages.

However, the “golden age” of figureheads is said to be between 1790 to about 1825.  During this time frame many warships and merchant ships built in North America and England were decorated with these artful figureheads.

But, the figureheads I found were built much more recently.

The first figurehead I spotted is by the artist Shalimar.

This figurehead was made by the artist Demetrius Lacroix.

This figurehead, which I did not include in my earlier post about the Lady Of Salem figureheads, was sculpted by Alicia Irick Cohen.  The figurehead does have some obvious wear and tear, unfortunately.

This figurehead was created by the YMCA/Girls Today Program.

The artist for this figurehead is Amberlynn Narvie.

Niko Papadimitriou is the artist for this figurehead.

This figurehead was created by Vonn Bittercup.

The artist for this figurehead is John Devine.

Kenneth Glover is the artist for this figurehead.

This blue faced beauty was created by Mr. Bleckley’s 5th grade student artists

Dori Phillips painted this figurehead.

This colorfully painted figurehead was made by Cynthia Mikula Smiszek.

Karen Lamesa and Tina Armstrong painted this figurehead.

Jeanne Pare-Kapnis painted this figurehead.

Sheila Billings made this figurehead.

The figurehead below was crafted by Jeanne Pare

The next figurehead was painted by Jill Pabich.

This figurehead was painted by Kerry May Killam.

Jeanne Pare-Kapnis painted this figurine that was located on Derby St.

Mary-Ellen Smiley painted this figurehead which was located in the Old Town Hall near the Essex Pedestrian Walkway.

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I could not locate a sign with the name of the artist for this figurehead.  Unlike most of the other figureheads, this one was located in a store on  Essex St (Witch Tee;s)

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Although not part of the Lady Of Salem display, there are additional figureheads in the Peabody Essex Museum, also on Essex St.  You would have to pay an entrance fee to the museum to view them.  But I have a photos of them below from my visit October 8 of last year.

Besides being the weekend of the arts festival, the weather was perfect for visitors and their dogs.  There were lots of dogs enjoying the figureheads and the festival.  Below are a few of the cute four legged visitors I met during my visit.

Brody is an adorable 10 year old mixed breed dog.

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Don’t blink or you might miss Wink, a 13 year old Pomeranian and Brody’s sibling.

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Aster, who is as handsome as the flower he is named after, is a Border Collie and Australian mix.

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Luna is a 3 year old Chihuahua.  He has very cute features.

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I love Lance’s fur and and sweet nature.  Lance is a 9 year old Standard Poodle.

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Who doesn’t love Golden Retrievers?  Not anyone I would want to know.  Bowen, named after a wharf in Newport, Rhode Island, is a 3 month old Golden Retriever.

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I am not sure how long the Ladies will be on display, although they may have all been taken down after the arts festival which ended Sunday (June 3).  I am pretty sure you may see them again during the summer, specifically during the 30th Annual Salem Maritime Arts Festival August 4th and 5th of this year.  It’s a pretty good bet you may see me there!

Also, keep an eye out for my photographs from the 10th Annual Salem Arts Festival from the first weekend of June which I will be posting in parts since there was so much to show you all!