Author Archives: New England Nomad

About New England Nomad

Hi I'm Wayne. Welcome to my blog. I am a true New Englander through and through. I love everything about New England. I especially love discovering new places in New England and sharing my experiences with everyone. I tend to focus on the more unique and lesser known places and things in New England on my blog. Oh yeah, and I love dogs. I always try to include at least one dog in each of my blog posts. I discovered my love of photography a couple of years ago. I know, I got a late start. Now, I photograph anything that seems out of the ordinary, interesting, beautiful and/or unique. And I have noticed how every person, place or thing I photograph has a story behind it or him or her. I don't just photograph things or people or animals. I try to get their background, history or as much information as possible to give the subject more context and meaning. It's interesting how one simple photograph can evoke so much. I am currently using a Nikon D3200 "beginner's camera." Even though there are better cameras on the market, and I will upgrade some time, I love how it functions (usually) and it has served me well. The great thing about my blog is you don't have to be from New England, or even like New England to like my blog (although I've never met anyone who doesn't). All you have to like is to see and read about new or interesting places and things. Hopefully, you'll join me on my many adventures in New England!

Stodder’s Neck (Hingham, MA)

Date Of Visit: June 15, 2017

Location: 467 Lincoln St, Hingham, MA (30 minutes southeast of Boston)

Cost: Free

Parking: There is ample parking for about 50 cars

Trail Size/Difficulty: .7 mile loop, easy trails with some gentle inclines and some side trails.

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Highlights: wide trails, picnic tables, water fountains for Fido, harbor views, wildlife, well maintained trails and grass for dogs to play

Website: Stodder’s Neck

Trail Map: Stodder’s Neck Trail Map

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Once the site of a gravel pit, Stodder’s Neck is now one of the most popular dog parks in the South Shore (south of Boston).  In fact, as the photo below shows, the park was designed as a dog park, although humans can also use it for birding, observing other dogs or just taking a leisurely walk.

The park has a water fountain with a spigot at dog’s level.

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There is also a board for people to hang lost dog tags (on hooks at the side of the board) and photos of dogs (many of whom have passed on) who enjoy the park as well as other notes of importance.

Even the entrance to the park has been designed to help prevent dogs from running ahead into the parking lot by having a narrow entrance.  I believe you may also open the gate at a different point if you need more room to enter or exit.

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The dirt trails at Stodder’s Neck have benches and picnic tables dotted along the way for you to sit and give your dog a chance to rest.

The views along the trail are impressive.

But, the best part of the trails has to be the Weymouth Back River that forms the peninsula the park sits on.

And dogs seem to like the river as well.

There are also a variety of birds and other animals at Stodder’s Neck.  Egrets also nest there during the spring and summer.  I came across this Egret hunting.

I guess I got too close and scared him or her.

And what would a dog park be without, you guessed it, dogs!?

Moose is a 5 year old Lab.

Harley, 7 years old, is part German Shepherd, Great Pyrenees,  Malinois.

Kylie is a 5 year old poogle

Mindy is a 4.5 year old rescue.

Mya is a 4 and a half year old Shepherd and Lab mix.

Macy is a one and a half year old pitbull and boxer mix.

Yuki is an 8 month old American Eskimo.  Yuki, for those of you not in the know, means “snow” in Japanese.

Tank is a one and a half year old Field Springer.

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17th Annual Hampton Beach Master Sand Sculpting Classic (Hampton Beach, NH)

Dates of Event: June 15 – June 17, 2017 (sculptures on display until June 28)

Location: 180 Ocean Blvd, Hampton Beach, NH

Cost: Free

Parking:

Effective May 1st – $2 per hour public parking. Pay at Pay Station and Must display receipt visibly on dashboard.

Handicap Parking – Handicap parking is available in any legal metered parking spot providing you have a Handicap Plate or a Hanging Handicap Tag hanging, or visible, in your front window.

There are also several parking lots (ranging from $5 to $20 a day) throughout the Hampton Beach area.

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Highlights: Sand sculptures by master sand sculptures

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Rain and chilly temperatures did not prevent master sand sculptors from playing in the sand last weekend at Hampton Beach.

The 17th annual sand sculpting competition attracted master sand sculptors from all over  the globe.  In case you missed the sculpting event, you can still view the sculptures until June 28 and they light the area at night so you can view them day or night.

Although all of the sculptures were worthy, only one could be crowned the champion.

First place went to Melineige Beauregard from Montreal Canada.  Beauregard’s sculpture is called “Dance of the Undefined.”  Melineige said her sculpture represents how we are constantly changing and yet some aspects of us stay the same.

Second place went to Abe Waterman from Prince Edward Island for his sculpture, “Get Out Of The Box.”  He also won the “Sculptor’s Choice Award” as well as my vote!  It had rained heavily the night before the sculptures were scheduled to be completed and, even though the sand is capable of withstanding some degree of inclement weather, his sculpture almost collapsed.  You can see a “crack” or line in his sculpture which was caused by the heavy rains.

Karen Fralich, of Toronto, Canada, took third place with “Tiny Warrior.”

David Andrews of Wauwatosa, Wisconsin, nabbed fourth place with “Hands Of Fate.”

Fifth place was awarded to Carl D. Jara of  for “I Can’t Get This Out Of My Mind.”

The People’s Choice Award was won by Michel LePire of Quebec for “Seduction.” This was Michel’s last sand sculpting competition as he is retiring.  he certainly went out with a bang!

Although they did not place, the rest of the sculptures were very creative and stunning.  It must have been very hard for the judges to decide on the winners.

Justin Gordon, of Groveland, MA, created his sculpture, “Gazing Life Beyond”, as a tribute to his mother in the afterlife.  Even though some of the other sand sculptures may have been more pleasing visually, I think Justin’s sentiment best.

Marc Lepire, of Quebec, dedicated his sculpture, “Grand Slam”,  to his children and all fans of baseball.  Can you tell by the number and team of the player who the person in the sculpture is?

Joris Kivits of the Netherlands sculpted Horizontalism.

New Hampshire resident Greg Hardy created he sculpture, “What A Lovely Way To Say You Love Me.”

 

There were also the sand sculptures of the sponsors of the event and a special sculpture dedicated to the New England sports fans!

As usual, there were lots of dogs at Hampton Beach to view this dog friendly event.

Vito (on the left) is a 10 year old Akita.  Vivian (on the right) is a 9 month old Akita.  Their fur was so soft!

Apollo, a 3 year old German Shepherd, is a gentle giant.

Zuzu, an 11 year old Beagle who was named after “Zuzu” from “it’s A Wonderful Life”, had her own wagon ride!

Bella, a 1 and a half year old Chihuahua, was all dressed up for her visit to the beach.

Roxy, an 8 year old English Pointer, is a sweetie.

Micky, a 7 month Apso Shih Tzu (also known as a Shih Apso), posed so well for me.

Tinkerbell, a 9 year old Yorkie, cooled off by a puddle.

Until next year, Hampton Beach!  Okay, maybe sooner than that.


Sail Boston Tall Ships (Boston, MA)

Dates Of Event June 17-22, 2017

Location: Boston, MA

Cost: Free (if you take a cruise out to see to the boats as I did fees would apply.  It costs $35 for adults and $30 for seniors.  Children and students also get reduced rates)

Parking: Due to the increase in visitors (they are expecting 2 million or more people) parking is limited.  The closest public transportation station is South Station on the Red line of the MBTA (fares are reduced for this period of time while people visit the event)

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Highlights: tall ships from all over the world in Boston Harbor

Website: Sail Boston

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Normally, when we see foreign boats in our harbor, it would be cause for alarm, especially given our past.  But, this group of ships from all over the world came in peace.

Millions have been predicted to descend upon Boston as we celebrate Sail Boston 2017.

To avoid the crowds and get a better view of the ships, I decided to book a boat on Mass Bay Lines to cruise by these majestic ships.  The boat was comfortable, wecould roam around the boat to get better views and we got so close to some of the freighters that we could wave and even shout to the crews on the boats.  In fact, some people on our boat shouted greetings in the language of the crew based on their point of origin.  I highly recommend taking a boat cruise if you plan on going to Sail Boston before the ships leave Thursday.

Our boat, The Freedom was docked at Rowes Wharf in the heart of the seaport district.

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The views leaving the pier were beautiful.

The first ship we noticed was the Europa.

From Netherlands, the Europa has a steel hull and has a rig height of 33 meters.  It was built in 1911.

When the ships did not have their sails up, it was difficult to identify them.  Someone did announce the names of the ships as we passed by them.  But, it was hard to hear him at times and it was also hard to keep track of them all.  I think this is Thomas E. Lannon, a 93 foot schooner from Gloucester, MA.  It was built in 1997.

This is the Esmeralda, the pride of the Chilean Navy.  Check out the condor on the figurehead.  To show just how different the ships look with and without their sails up, look at the photo below from the Sail Boston website.  Big difference.  Oh yeah, and their photography might be a little bit more professional.  Just a little though.

 

The Oliver Hazard Perry from Newport, RI, is a baby compared to most of the other ships from the Tall Ships festival.  It was built in 2016.

Again, it looks much more impressive with its sails raised.

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Alert is a 70 foot schooner from Bailey Island, Maine.  It has a wood hull and it was built in 1992.  I was able to get the ship in various stages of dress.

The Adirondack III is an 80 foot schooner from Boston, MA.  It was built in 1997 and it has a wood hull.

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The Schooner Adventure is from Gloucester, MA.  It was built in 1926 and it is 122 feet long.

When and If is another 80 foot schooner.  It is from Key West, Florida and it was built in 1939.

The Formidable is a brigantine from Boston, MA.  It is 72 feet long and was built in 2000.

I was hoping to see more ships, especially with their full sails on.  But, I still think we saw a variety of pretty ships and boats.  What really caught my eyes was the buildings and structures against the ships and boats in the harbor.

These kayakers may have had the best views.  But, I think being dry on the boat was better for taking photographs.

Dogs like the tall ships also!  Cole, an 8 year old poodle, and his mom came by to view the tall ships.

To see videos, photos and other posts that I do not include on my blog, please connect with me on Facebook!


SculptureNow (Lenox, MA)

Date Of Visit: June 4, 2017

Location: The Mount, 2 Plunkett St, Lenox, MA

Dates and Hours of Exhibit: June, 2017 – October, 31, 2017, The Mount is open daily from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm through October 31st, except on early closing days (please see below). The Mount is open from 10:30 am – 3:00 pm most weekends in November through February. Please call 413-551-5100 to confirm hours.

Cost: $18 for adults, $17 for seniors (65 and older), $13 for students, children and teens (18 and under) get in free, $10 for military personnel (cost includes a tour of the Edith Wharton house and if you return within 10 days you can get in free again with your receipt)

Parking: There is ample parking available at The Mount.

Handicapped Accessible: Yes.  The trail is dirt bit wide and even for the most part.

Dog Friendly: No, except for service dogs possibly

Highlights: art on a easy trail, scenic views

Website: SculptureNow

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As if the Mount wasn’t beautiful enough, there are 30 amazing sculptures to compliment its beauty.

There are 30 sculptures along the trail.  But, when I went to visit in early June, not all of the sculptures were up.  I did the best I could to photograph as many as I could find.  But, I didn’t have a map or any other guide at the time to find them.  So, it was something like a “scavenger hunt” when I did visit the sculptures.  It looks like I found 22 of the 30 sculptures.  The art has a modern feel to it.  All thirty sculptures should be up now for your viewing pleasures.

The numbers next to the descriptions correspond to the descriptions in the map of the trail where the sculptures are located.  The link to the trail map is attached above in the website link.

1. The first sculpture is called Stall by Nancy Winship Milliken.  Nancy describes her sculpture as the following:

“This site-specific memorial honors the activities and architecture of a New England past. The horsehair gestures towards the building at The Mount which was at one time Wharton’s stable.”

2. The second sculpture is called Day’s End by James Kitchen.  James says his sculpture this way:

“Does our fast-paced, distraction filled world allow time to think, read and reflect, enjoy art in all its forms? Exhausted, we let media affirm our feelings rather than inform us.”

3. The third sculpture is by Harold Grinspoon.  According to Grinspoon, his art is:

“Giving new meaning to objects that have aged out of their original purpose, I invoke nostalgia for the familiar and an appreciation of new forms of beauty.”

4. 3. “Fallen Sky” by Coral Penelope Lambert is the next sculpture.  Coral explains her art this way:

“My work explores forces of nature and seeks to address the darker issues related to Earth’s resources such as mining and contamination where traces of the process remain.”

5. Stack C by Lydia Musco is a combination of nature and architecture:

“Architecture and elements of nature, such the work of gravity, influence this work. The form is built in one additive action, line by line, like layers of stories within memories.”

6. James N Burnes’ sculpture Nine Piece Ring is the next sculpture.  Burnes described his art this way:

“I create forms from nature that express our intimate relationship with Mother Earth. I am drawn to the tension between the natural and organic, man and nature, time and decay.”

7. Biomorphic by Michael Thomas is the next sculpture.  According to Michael, Biomorphic is:

“An undulating, sensual, and playful organic form, often encountered on the periphery of the natural world, realized here in steel. Biomorphic is the fluid movement of mass, coupled together with the visceral experience of color and texture.”

8. Distant by Philip Marshall is, according to Marshall:

“The nude model at a figure drawing held his pose for hours, eyes fixed on a distant point, maintaining his mental distance under prolonged scrutiny; he and the chair becoming one.”

9. Off The Rails by Lucy Hodgson:

“Our country: how we got here and is there a way forward? This is a comment on the decline of infrastructure—among many other things.”

10. Sheep by Madeleine Lord is:

“A pile of galvanized scrap metal sheering implied the subject: Steel Wool. I work the skeletal to the surface and the surface to the skeletal. Pulse arrives after I finish.”

11. Joseph Carpineto’s Walkabout

“This sculpture is inspired by a memory of the coarse undershirts my mother made for me from flour sacks. The rough feel of the rope is reminiscent of those undershirts.”

12. Bench I by Peter Barrett:

“Please, have a seat! I’ve wanted to incorporate some stone into my work since visiting a friend’s marble quarry, and here you have my first attempt.”

13. Anabasis by Chris Plaisted:

“I like to work with steel for its strength and powerful emotion. The subject is the human spirit. I was inspired by the sea and the concept of an upward journey.”

14. Yellow Peril by Setsuko Winchester:

“In 2015 & 2016, these 120 handpinched tea bowls traveled to ten U.S. concentration camps where 120,000 persons (mostly U.S. citizens) were imprisoned during WWII. Their crime was to be Japanese.”

15. Reflective Change by Martina Angela Muller:

“The undulating lines of music and the sculptural force of the wind informed these shapes. Both are continuous game changers that generate inner and outer movement leading to reflective change.

16. Avoidance Attractor by Matt Crane:

“Avoidance Attractor in its first iteration explores structure and materiality with a shift in scale and orientation. An empty piece of signage that invites projection, while remaining stoic and silent.”

17.  Netting For Water by Ann Jon:

“My work is an adventure, exploring new forms and media, hoping the viewer’s eye, mind, and heart will experience the sculpture visually, creating their own narrative or message.”

18. Fenestral by William Carlson:

“This sculpture is intended to pull the audience into the small portals of light as the sun rises and sets. The piece acts like a clock while controlling the viewer’s perception of the landscape.”

19. Blue Pulse by Murray Dewart:

“I want my sculptures to convey both the momentum of ritual pilgrimage and the stasis of meditative mandalas. They gesture in their various ways as resolute guardian forms, protective and consoling.”

20. Gnomon 1 by Christopher Curtis:

“Much of my work seeks context for humankind’s place in the natural world. Gnomon 1, made with stone, stainless steel, and gold leaf, is a good example of this investigation.”

21. Waterstone by Dove Bradshaw:

“Waterstone is a time-sculpture: For a slow action of water boring a hole, limestone was used; for fast boring, salt boulders and granulated salt mounds. Outdoors in winter, vodka replaced water.”

22. Poet’s Cry by Colleen O’Donnell:

“Weepings of unsound. A poet’s cry of light. Reflecting back into herself.”

23. Bittern by Robin Tost:

“The Bittern is a marsh bird who, when alarmed, stretches up its neck so that the striations on its breast give it perfect camouflage in the reeds.”

24. Twelve Cuboid Stack, I by David Teeple:

“My work centers on water as a subject, a material, and an idea. In this sculpture, I am interested in how the reflections and refractions create a new perceptual experience.”

25. Yellow Dakota + River by Stuart Farmery:

“Through abstract forms I reference a passage of time combining art historical sources, such as stone circles and constructivist concepts, with my awareness of current political, environmental, and communal issues

26. Hedge by Gary Orlinsky:

“Inspired by the two rows of linden trees that link the Mount’s gardens, Hedge creates a provocative dialogue between the organic movement of the saplings and the geometry of the boxes

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27. Gilavar by William Brayton:

“This abstract sculpture developed in response to a range of sources, including indigenous wind patterns, Polynesian stick charts, wooden boat building methods, storm tracking data, and chance-based fabrication systems.”

28. Gene by Eric Stein:

“Representing cause and effect, the cast concrete units of molecular design are stacked, colliding randomly. They present an undetermined beginning and illustrate the natural selection of options of creativity, form, and life

29. Tree With Spheres Jacque Metheny

“My sculpture juxtaposes geodesic spheres with the yet more complex structure of a tree. Geometric systems are the foundation of all material form. In nature we understand this as beauty.”

30. Caterpillar Bridge II by Roe Osborn:

“My sculpture combines construction materials in contextual mathematical formulas. This piece joins sections of drainage pipe in a dimensional sequence that captures and defines space in an engaging, yet playful manner.


Boston Dragon Boat Festival (Cambridge, MA)

Date Of Event: June 11, 2017 (annually every second Sunday of June)

Location: Charles River, Memorial Drive, Cambridge, MA

Cost: Free

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Highlights: Dragon boat races, Asian art/music, food trucks, cultural events

Website: Boston Dragon Boat Festival

IMG_1815Thousands of people converged on the Charles River last weekend to celebrate the 38th annual Dragon boats festival.  Over 30 teams raced 39 foot Hong Kong along a 500 meter course (CYPN Storm won  the Club Challenge, “A” Division).

 

 

 

 

These rowers were getting amped up for their next race.

 

 

 

 

While these rowers stretched for their next event.

 

 

 

 

This rower had just finished a successful race.  The writing on his paddle translates to “Dragon Block.”

 

 

 

 

Kayakers also like to utilize the Charles for their own recreation and, for the most part, they were able to paddle around without interfering with the racers.

 

 

 

 

But, there weren’t just boats and kayaks at the event.

There were also cultural events.

 

 

 

 

Martial arts demonstrations

 

 

 

 

The grace and beauty of the participants were matched by the grace and beauty of the Charles River and Cambridge in the background.  And there is lots of beauty along the Charles.

 

 

 

 

This spectator got a chance to try out a seat on a dragon boat.  I think she liked it.

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There were also a variety of musical and artistic performers.

 

 

 

 

Memorial Drive, where the event was located, is always closed part of the day on Sundays from April until November so that joggers, cyclists dog walkers and anyone else can move freely on the roadway without worrying about traffic.  This road closure made it easy for for trucks to do business.  There were dozens of food trucks and vendors stationed along the road.

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Dogs are also welcome at the event.

Riley showed up with his ball.

 

 

 

 

Pitko, a Finnish name pronounced “Pete-co”, had a fun time at the festival.

 

 

 

 

Guy was all smiles as he watched the festivities.

 

 

 

 

“Princess”, a Himalayan cat, wasn’t afraid to show up at the race even if there dogs there.

 

 

 

 

Below are some videos of the race and cultural performers.

Please click on the link below to connect with me on Facebook at New England Nomad to view videos, photos and other media not included in this blog.  Thank you!


Hanna-Barbera Exhibit (Stockbridge, MA)

Date Of Visit: May 28, 2017

Location: Norman Rockwell Museum, 9 Glendale Rd, Stockbridge, MA

Dates Of Exhibit: Unfortunately, the exhibit is no longer at the museum.  It was such a big attraction, I wouldn’t be surprised if it did come back at another time, though.

Handicapped Accessible: Yes, the Norman Rockwell Museum is one of the more handicapped accessible places I have been to

Highlights: animations, drawings and collectibles from the Hanna-Barbera cartoon collection

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Yogi, Fred, Richie and even Jabber.  They were all there at the Norman Rockwell Museum last month. as the Norman Rockwell Museum showed off some of the works of the Hanna-Barbera cartoon franchise.  Just as a warning, some of the photos may not look top notch because we weren’t allowed to use a flash in the museum.

As I walked along the various drawings of my childhood, it was like walking down memory lane.  I could envision the shows I loved so dearly.  All I needed was a bowl of Cap ‘N Crunch and a glass of O.J.  and my footie pajamas and it would have been just like my childhood.  OK, I still might have a pair of footie pj’s.

The popular shows were represented of course.

But, what was great about the exhibit is how they showed some of the more obscure shows in the exhibit.  At least they were obscure to me.  In fact, I didn’t even remember some of the shows they featured until I saw them at the museum.

There was also a television playing a short documentary about Hanna-Barbera playing on a loop for visitors to watch as they checked out the comics and there was a scavenger-like game kids could play with their parents to find certain characters in the drawings at the exhibit.  Also, an employee gave an informative tour of the drawings and collectibles.

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Another cool thing about the exhibit was that some people offered to lend their collectibles to the exhibit for display.  Some people have quite a few collectibles!

Here’s a fun fact.  Well, it;s a fact.  Not sure if it is “fun” our tour guide told us how Jackie Gleason almost stopped the Flintstones from happening.  Apparently, Gleason watched an episode and he noticed how the story lines, the shows basic setup and characters were essentially the same as his show, The Honeymooners.  But, even though he would have had a case in court, he stopped short of stopping the show because he didn’t want to be known as the guy who stopped the Flintstones show.  Nowadays, every show seems to mirror The Honeymooners.

The exhibit was organized so neatly.  It encompassed three spacious rooms and each inch of the walls seemed to be covered with a drawing or card with information on it.  Yet, the art work didn’t seem cramped.

I would have to say seeing some of the drawings from the more obscure shows like “Jabber Jaws” and “The Ed Grimley Show” brought back some of broadest smiles if “I must say” (I actually liked the Joe Flaherty segment of the show when he played the “Count Floyd” character best).

I hope I was able to make you smile on this Tuesday!

What were some of your favorite shows from the drawings above?


Dock Dogs 2017 (Agawam, MA)

 

Date Of Event: June 3, 2017 (first weekend of June each year)

Location: Parking lot of Dave’s Soda And Pet City, 151 Springfield Street
Agawam, MA

Cost: Free

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Highlights: dogs, jumping,speed and agility contests, face painting, fund raising

Website: Dock Dogs

IMG_9966Dogs big and small came from all over New England and farther to take part in the Dock Dogs competition last week in Agawam, MA.

 

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In case you missed it, I covered last year’s Dock Dogs event.

There were two events at Dock Dogs during my visit.  There was the Big Air Wave and the Extreme Vertical contests.

The first event, the Big Air Wave contest, was a jumping contest.  The dog’s trainer would throw an object, usually a tennis ball, Frisbee or toy, and the dog would jump as far as he or she could to retrieve it.

Just watching the trainers getting their pets psyched up for the jump was fun to watch.

Some dogs needed a little more encouragement than others.  But, what I really loved was the trust and discipline the dogs had.

The second event was the Extreme Vertical contest. Each dog would have the chance to reach the bar resting on a hook.  Although the dogs try to grab the bar in their mouths, all the dog has to do is knock the bar off the hooks to be successful.  Yeah, that”s easy enough for me to say.

Even if the dogs didn’t grab the bar in their mouth they could still advance to the next round by just knocking it off the holder.  The winner was Coop, a 2 year old, Chocolate Lab, who was able to grab the bar at 7 feet, 2 inches.

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Some people seemed more interested in the swarm of bees one of the trees near the competition.

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By the time we came back from lunch, bee keepers had been called and had handled the situation.

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Not all of the dogs who came to Dave’s for the event participated.  But, even if they were just spectators they were still beautiful.  Below are just some of the dogs I saw at the Dock Dogs event.

Duke is an 8.5 year old German Short Hair Pointer.

This 10 wek old Belgian Malinois did not have a name yet.

Bella is a 7 year old Pomeranian.  She is known as “Bella The Therapy Dom.”  She works with Paws For Friendship as a therapy dog as well as being the official mascot of the East Forest Park Library.  You can find out more about Paws For Friendship here.  You can also contact Bella at bellatherapydog@gmail.com

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Lola is a 2 year old mini Pincher Chihuahua.

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Fiona is a 8 month old Maltese Yorkie.

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Fargo is a 3 year old German Shepherd.

Inky is a 15 month old Blue Merle Australian Sheepdog.

Meeko is a 15 month old Siberian Husky.

Tobin is a 2 year old Great Pyrenees.  His sister Maggie Mae, a 3 year old Great Pyrenees and Golden Retriever, is behind and to the right in the photos.

Token is a 5 year old Belgian Tervuren.

Fluffy Puffer, with the signature Newfoundland signature drool, is a 1 and a half year old Newfie

Miller is a 1 year old Golden Retriever and German Shepherd.

Rufus is a 7 year old Newfie.

Max is a 9 year old Border Collie.

There was also face painting, a bouncy house (I was tempted to go in it) and a variety of vendors and charitable organizations at the event.

Can’t wait until the next year’s Dock Dogs event!

Below are some videos of the dogs competing at Dock Dogs!

 

Please connect with me on Facebook to see other fun stuff not included in this blog!