Category Archives: Hampton, NH

18th Annual Hampton Beach Master Sand Sculpting Classic (Hampton, NH)

Dates Of Event: June 14-16 (usually annually, the second or third weekend in June)

Location: Hampton Beach, Hampton, NH

Cost: Free

Hours: the sculptures are accessible for viewing all day until June 27, except between 1 a.m. and 5 a.m. when the beach is closed

Parking: Parking info can be found here

Wheelchair Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Tips: The sculptures will be able to be viewed at night when they illuminate the area

Related Posts: 2017 Hampton Beach Sand Sculpting Competition

2016 Hampton Beach Sand Sculpting Competition

Website: Hampton Sand Sculpture Event

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Sculptors don’t just sculpt wood, ice and clay.  In fact, some of the world’s best sculptors like to play in the sand.  And that’s exactly what they were doing last weekend at Hampton Beach, NH.

The theme of this year’s sand sculpture of the sponsors of the event was “The Aliens Have Come To Hampton Beach.”  All of the featured sculptors contributed to this sculptor.

 

The massive sand sculpture included a memorial to Canadian sculptor and regular Hampton Beach Master Sand Sculpting Classic competitor Michel Lepire.

Michel passed away earlier this year.  But, his son, Marc Lepire, did participate and made a special tribute for his dad in his  own sculpture.

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The competition included 10 sand sculptures, not included the sponsors’ sculptures, with sculptors from all over the globe.

Visitors to the beach were allowed to view the sculptures up close on the beach at 1 o’clock and given a ticket to put in a bucket next to their choice.  While it is great to be able to get so close to the sculptures and I did take photographs while I could get close to them, the sculptors have until 4 to complete their works.  And, of course, they use every minute at their disposal usually.  So, I didn’t end up posting most of the photos I took at 1.  But, I did cast a vote (for “Influence” by Carl Jara).  Then, I waited a few more hours so I could photograph the sculptures in their completed states.  Time goes by pretty quickly at the beach, though.  So I didn’t mind waiting.  After all, I’m a pretty patient person, except when I am driving.

When the votes for the sculptures by the official judges were finally tallied the winners were recognized and given their awards ($3,000 for first place) and a fireworks display capped off the festivities.  Below are the top ranked sculptures and the also rans.

First place went to “Temptation” by Abe Waterman of Prince Edward Island.

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Melineige Beauregard of Montreal nabbed second place with her sculpture “Rising.”

 

Dan Belcher of Missouri swam into third place with “Water Dance.”  This was certainly one of the larger sculptures.  It must have taken many hours to make all of these shapes and designs.

 

“Influence” by Carl Jara of Ohio came in fourth place.  he also won the “Sculptor’s Choice” award which must be very rewarding since it is voted on by his peers.

 

David Andrews of Wisconsin came in fifth place with “Ancestral Swirl.”

 

The “People’s Choice” award which the visitors got to vote for went to Marc Lepire of Quebec for “Wind Lovers.”

 

The remaining sculptures are listed below.  I was actually surprised that some of them, like “Winging It” by Delayne Corbett of Vancouver did not place in the voting.  Since ikt had so much intricate detail I thouggh tit was sure to be in the top 5.  But there was so much competition at the event.  So, even some of the best sculptures didn’t make top rankings.

 

“Defeating The Darkness” by Justin Gordon of Groveland, MA, was another sculpture I thought may have been overlooked.  There’s a lot of wonderful detail in this one.

 

This futuristic looking sculpture called “Three Phase Steam Phork” was sculpted by California sculpture Kirk Radimaker.

 

There’s something about the sculpture “Joy” by Karen Fralich.

I’m not sure if it’s the name of the sculpture, the seemingly carefree child or the butterflies sporadically placed throughout the sculpture.  But, something about this sculpture makes me smile.

 

If you missed the sand sculptures last weekend, don’t worry.  They will be on display until Wednesday, June 27.  They also illuminate the area for night viewing if you can’t make it there during the day time.

The wires you may see sticking out of the tops of some of the sculptures, shown sticking out of the head of the sculpture in the photo below, are meant to deter birds from landing on.

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No matter.  Some birds still found a way to land on them.

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The sand sculpting event had more than just sculptures, though.  There were other family friendly activities as well such as face painting.

 

There were also so many cute dogs at the event.

Watson is a 5 year old Dalmatian Coonhound.  he was adopted from the Pope Memorial SPCA.

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Jackson, a 5 year old Great Dane, was another gentle giant.  He was a little hard to get to look at me because his dad was parking the car and he kept looking to his left and right in the hopes of seeing his human.

 

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Greta is a 7 year old German Drahthaar.

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Bailey, who will be 6 months Sunday the 25th (yes she is a Christmas baby), is a Teacup Yorkie.  She was dressed to the nines for her day at the beach.

 

Some dogs are a little shy of my camera.  This was the case with Luna, a 1 year old pit and lab mix.  At least at first.  But, she warmed up to the camera pretty quickly.

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Bailey is a 6 month Standard Poodle.  With her fluffy fur, she reminded me of a big teddy bear.

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Buddy, a 14 year old Cairn Terrier, was certainly not in Kansas anymore.  That’s right, Buddy is the exact same breed as Toto from The Wizard Of Oz movie.  If you haven’t seen it, I highly recommend it.  Just look out for the “flying monkeys.”

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Brady, who was named after a certain local sports star, is an 11 month old Cavachon.  Are you saying to yourself, Cava what?  I did too.  His folks told me he is a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and Bichon Frise mix.

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And, last but not least, Tyzon, a Boxer, will be 5 years old in September.  It had been a long day taking photographs and I was ready to get ready to head home.  Then, when I saw Tayzon I decided to take out my camera for one more dog photo.  He was very accommodating and the kids loved petting him.  And he loved the pets he recieved.

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Kite Day (Hampton Beach, NH)

 

Date Of Event: May 20, 2018

Location: Hampton Beach, 160 Ocean Blvd, Hampton, NH (about an hour north of Boston, MA and an hour northeast of Nashua, NH)

Hours: Hampton Beach is open everyday.  The beach is closed from 1 a.m. until sunrise.

Parking:  Parking cost me $2 an hour during my visit (pre-Memorial Day).  There are various parking options and rates at Hampton Beach.  You can find the parking rates here.  There are also several parking lots that generally charge $20 for all day parking during the late spring and summer seasons.

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Highlights: kites, kite flying

Fun Facts:

  • Recently, “kite day” has also served as the “Kites Against Cancer” event in which funds are raised to fight cancer (the event was cancelled this year)
  • In addition to the visitors kites, the beach staff tie up several jumbo sized kites of their own

Website: Kites Against Cancer

Related Post: Kites Against Cancer 2017

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The next time tells you to go fly a kite.  Don’t take it personal.  Just head over to Hampton Beach.

Hampton Beach held their annual “Kite Day” event last weekend.  The Kite Day event usually serves as the day of the Kites Against Cancer event.  But, due to forecasts of potential of rainstorms and thunderstorms (and very high winds), the Kites Against Cancer event was cancelled.  Hopefully, the vent was merely postponed for another date (I will keep you all updated on my Facebook page if it does change dates).   You can learn more about the charity this event supports and make a donation at the Beyond The Rainbow website.

The high winds, perhaps too high, made for some great kite plying weather.  It also helped cool down the visitors at the beach.  The photos of the waves at the beach give a little evidence of the high winds that day.

 

 

Did I mention it was windy?  Well, there were some brave souls who decided to fly their kites despite the strong winds.

 

 

And, of course, the staff at Hampton Beach did a great job making sure their kites stayed up in the air despite the…well, you know.

 

 

What the event lacked in kites, it made up for in dogs.  There were dogs everywhere!

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Baxter, a 5 year old Boxer mix rescue, was having fun playing in the sand.

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Brady is a 2 year old Boxer.  Say what you want, Tom has nothing on this Brady.

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Razz, a 3 year old Jack Russell mix, I especially liked his black and white face.

 

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Brutus is a 1 and a half year old English Bulldog.  I don’t know what’s cutest about him.  The wrinkles, the tongue out or the cute little legs!

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Jackson, a 1 year old mixed breed, struck a pose for me during his walk.

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Kobe is a 16 month old Great Dane.  But, the real question is, can he dunk?  Scratch that.  At his height I would say most definitely.

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Goober is a 10 year old mixed breed who loves to play in the water.

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Pearl, a 6 year old English Springer Spaniel, is a gem of a dog!

If all this wasn’t enough, I arrived at the parking lot just in time to see the parade of trucks making their way to the 45th Annual Hampton Beach Tow and Trade Show.  This yearly event begins with a convoy of trucks, and a few wayward car drives who got mixed up in it making their way to the park for the event.  The neighbors must love all of the honking and diesel fumes at 10 a.m. on a Saturday.  Actually, a few of them did as you can see in the video below.  As an fyi, it is over 12 minutes long.

Don’t forget to check out and like my Facebook page!

 

 

 


Tuck Museum (Hampton, NH)

Date Of Visit: June 16, 2017

Location:40 Park Avenue, Hampton, NH (about 1 hour north of Boston, MA and 45 minutes east of Manchester, NH)

Hours: Spring / Summer / Fall Museum Hours
Sunday, Wednesday, Friday
1 to 4pm

Winter Museum Hours
January, February, and March
Wednesday, Friday
1 to 4pm
Sunday by appointment

Cost: Free but donations are appreciated

Parking: There is parking available at the side entrance of the building.  There is also additional parking behind the building.

Handicapped Accessible: Yes (thanks to Ryan Lamers)

Highlights: historical artifacts, memorials

Website: Tuck Museum Complex

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Who knew Hampton had so much history?  That is what many visitors think when they leave the Tuck Museum in Hampton, NH.

But, it really shouldn’t surprise anyone that so much history.  After all, it is one of the oldest settled areas of New Hampshire having been settled in 1638.

It’s also surprising that a small museum can have so much historical items and stories.  Upon entering the museum, you will most likely notice some of the historical articles from many years ago.  One of the main features is are the items from the defunct railway that ran to Hampton.

There are also two mannequins dressed in old military clothing from an earlier era.  This is a preview of an exhibit I will discuss later in this post.

The Tuck Museum is considered a “museum complex” because it has several structures and memorials on its land.  Guided tours are given to all of these buildings by the very knowledgeable staff.

The first place our guide took us to was the fire fighter building which had older firefighting equipment and vehicles.  It’s hard to believe , but true, that some of these vehicles were moved by humans, not horses, in the early days of the fire department in Hampton.  It is fitting since the fire department still remains the same – physically go and save lives, despite all of the technological advancements they have made.  It still boils down to the one constant – the brave men and women who work in that profession everyday.

You may notice the name Winnacunnet on the fire engine pictured above.  That used to be the name of Hampton (more specifically it was called Plantation of Winnacunnet) because of the pine trees in the area (Winnacunnet translates to “beautiful place of pines”).  A high school and street in the Hampton area still bear this name.

The next building we went to on the property of the Tuck Museum complex was the barn which contained many of the machines, tools and equipment the people used to farm the land and conduct the everyday chores of the settlers of Hampton.  Everything from fishing equipment, agricultural devices to a shoe cobbler’s counter were housed in this barn.  Each of these devices has a story and history behind it.

It would take too long and take up too much space to explain each one.  But, if you do go on the tour at the museum the tour guide will keep you entertained with various anecdotes and fun facts about these machines and tools.  One fun fact you can impress your friends and hot dates with at dinner parties is that when cobblers made shoes there was only one shape to them so you could wear any shoe on any foot.  I was joking – please don’t tell anyone that on a date.

There is also a special military exhibit dedicated to the people connected to Hampton, NH.  Included in this exhibit are letters from people serving that have been donated on a temporary basis from family and friends of those who served abroad during wartime.  One of the storiees that stood out to me from my visit to this memorial was the story of Hampton residentof Lt. Rita Palmer and the Angels of Bataan.

The final room of the museum (I told you it was surprisingly big) was a room with household items and some of the luxuries of the early settlers of the area.

The framed work of art pictured above was made of human hair (does that make it a bona-fide “hair loom”?).

There are also some replicas of beach houses that used to dot the landscape of the Hampton area on the grounds.  Since it was raining outside, I was unable to get to them without getting my camera equipment wet, unfortunately.

Hampton has a rather obscure dark side in the form of a witch, Eunice “Goody” Cole.  Eunice Cole was the only woman convicted of witchcraft in Hampton, NH (although many others have been casually accused of being one I am sure).

After being released from indentured servitude, her husband and she settled in Mount Wollaston (now Quincy, MA) and they eventually made their way to Hampton, NH.  Since they did not have children (they were both beyond child bearing age) and some other characteristics of her that were considered unusual at the time, she must have been a witch.  Of course.  She was actually accused of witchcraft several times.  the first time she was convicted of witchcraft was in 1660.  She served 2 years in prison and was sentenced again for a number of years in 1668.  She was also found not guilty of witchcraft when she was tried in 1673.  And I thought we were litigious these days.

Eventually, Goody Cole was absolved of her accused crime of witchcraft on March 8, 1938.  The citizens passed a resolution restoring Eunice “Goody” Cole to her rightful place as a citizen of Hampton. The city went as far as to burn copies of all her court documents,  The burned documenst were said to be mixed with soil from her last home and reputed resting place and buried.  However, it was actually given to the Tuck Museum.

This brings me to the last few photos of the museum and its grounds.  Inside the museum there are some replicas of Goody Cole.

On the grounds of the museum is a memorial without her name or any other marking.  In fact, if you did not know the story about Eunice Cole you may just pass by it none the wiser. The marker was erected by Harold Fernald, a teacher and part time police officer from Hampton.  The stone is said to be from the location of Eunice Cole’s property.

As an aside, the North Shore paranormal Group and some other paranormal groups have done ghost hunting on the premises with what they considered convincing results that some paranormal activity occurred.  The fact the museum is located right across the street from a graveyard, mixed with the Goody Cole history, has added to the theories of paranormal activity.  Admittedly, I saw some unusual things during my stay in hampton.  But, it was mostly at the beach.

Another memorial on the grounds of Tuck Museum is dedicated to Thorvald, the brother of Viking explorer Leif Erickson and son of Erik the Red.  However, this memorial has more of a controversial past as some believe it was just a rock put there by Judge Charles A. lamprey to increase the value of land that he was developing for beach cottages in 1902.  Whatever the true story behind the rock, it has become a popular tourist attraction.

The grounds of the museum are well kept and worth strolling by even if you don’t venture into the museum.

marylizstyles is a fellow New England blogger who specializes in the fashion blogging genre.  Read a post about her recent dude that’s so nautical fashion adventure in Hampton, NH.