Tag Archives: Photography

21st Annual Hampton Beach Sand Sculpting Classic (Hampton Beach, Hampton, NH)

Dates Of Event: June 17 -19, 2021

Location: Hampton Beach, 115 Ocean Blvd, Hampton, NH

Hours: The beach is accessible daily from dawn until dusk

Cost: Free

Parking: Hampton Beach offers a variety of parking options.  If you’re lucky enough to get a parking spot in the main parking area it is $2 an hour during the summer.  There are also additional lots that range from 5 to 20 dollars for the day depending on when you arrive.  See link for additional parking info: Parking Info

Universally Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes but dogs are not allowed on the beach during the summer

Website: https://hamptonbeach.org/event-listing/21st-annual-hampton-beach-sand-sculpting-classic/

Highlights: sand sculptures

Summary: Ten artists converged upon Hampton Beach to sculpt pieces of work.

Nothing says summer like long days of sunlight, road trips and, of course, sand sculptures. And as proof of this, Hampton Beach has ushered in the season with their 21st annual sand sculpting classic.

Ten sculptors from all the world put their talents to work at the sculpting competition. But, before the contest began the competitors collaborated to build the 100 ton main sponsor site sculpture. The sculpture pays tribute to the New Hampshire Marine Memorial statue which is located at the beach, the lifeguards who help to keep the beach safe and the sea life of the area.

The competition began on Jun 17 and ended on the 19th. Two hundred tons of sand are used for the sculptures and each competitor was given a plot size of 18×18 to complete their work on.

Although I haven’t been able to attend the actual sand sculpting competition the past few years, I do make sure to visit the day after the competition to photograph the sculptures in their pristine state. Even though I arrived at sunrise, there was already a healthy crowd at the beach and it was hard to get some photos with people in the background. But by using some creative angles and with some patience I was able to get most of the photos without any beachgoers in them.

After hours of grueling work, the winners were announced June 19th.

The winning sculpture “Empty” was sculpted by Abe Waterman of Prince Edward Island, Canada. Abe said he came up with the idea for this sculpture about a year and a half ago after his separation from his wife.

Second place was awarded to Melineige Beauregard of Montreal, Canada for “Rebirth Of Phoenix.” Melineige won the first place award last year.

Karen Fralich of Toronto Canada snagged third place with he sculpture, “Poker Face.”

And fourth place was awarded to Thomas Koet of Satellite Beach, Florida, for his sculpture, “Multiple Piercings.” Thomas also won the “People’s Choice Award” for his 2020 sculpture.

Chris Guinto of Key West, Florida, won the “Sculptor’s Choice Award” for his “Continuum” sculpture.

I don’t envy the judges who had to decide on the winning sculptures. They were all so well done.

The remaining sculptures are, in no particular order,

“Behind Every Successful Man There is a Strong Woman” by John Gowdy of Atlantic City, New Jersey.

“Pulled” by Carl D. Jara from Lyndhurst, Ohio

“Once Bitten” by Greg Grady of Derry, New Hampshire.

“Laugh” by Dan Belcher of Saint Louis, Missouri.

“Miss You, My Friend” by Justin Gordon of Groveland, Massachusetts. For some reason this one touched a chord with me.

Wally and the Plymouth Rock assurance mascot were also part of the sand sculpture celebration.

There was also a sand sculpture dedicated to retired police officer Jack Donaldson who passed away earlier this year from cancer. Jack worked both as a teacher and as a part time officer for 50 years.

The sand sculptures are lit up at night and they are removed after a week or two. So they may no longer be there. At least not until next year!


Daffodils At Tower Hill (Tower Hill Botanic Garden, Boylston, MA)

Date Of Visit: April 25, 2021

Location: Tower Hill Botanic Garden, 11 French Drive, Boylston, MA (about an hour northwest of Boston, MA or 1 hour north of Providence, RI)

Hours: Open Daily, 10am–5pm (Tower Hill is closed on Thanksgiving, December 24, December 25, December 31, and January 1)

Cost: (all tickets must be purchased online at their website for a specific timed entry but visitors can stay as late as they wish)

Members: FREE (must reserve ticket)
Adults: $16
Seniors (65+): $11
Youth (6-18): $6
Children 5 and under: Free (must reserve ticket)

Dogs $7 (dogs are not allowed in the Yarnstorm grounds but there are trails they are allowed on)

Parking: there are about 100 plus free parking spots

Universally Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes (dogs are not at Yarnstorm, but dogs are only allowed on the trails outside of the garden)

Summary: 40 artists knitted a variety of designs in the garden areas of Tower Hill Botanic Garden

Website: https://www.towerhillbg.org/

Every year, daffodils become the centerpiece of the gardens at the Tower Hill Botanic Garden as well as the rest of New England,. And this year was no different. According to their website, the peak time of the daffodils is the 3rs week of April until the first week of May. So, I chose the last week of April to visit.

Unfortunately, it was raining during my visit. The rain did let up a bit during my visit. But it did rain during my entire visit. And the rain did make for some pretty photo opportunities with the droplets on the flowers.

Ironically, it wasn’t the daffodils that stood out the most. It was the tulips that really caught my eye.

The decor of the gardens at Tower Hill Help to accentuate the beauty of the flowers.

Unfortunately, I could not stay long due to the rain and the difficulty taking photos while I tried to keep my camera dry. But I did my best to capture the beauty there as best I could. But daffodils will be there again next year and so will i!


Old Scituate Light (Scituate, MA)

Date Of Visit: April 10, 2021

Location: 100 Lighthouse Rd, Scituate, MA (about 40 mins southwest of Boston, MA or 1 hour northwest of Providence, RI)

Parking: There is a small parking area for about half a dozen cars and an overflow lot across the street

Hours: Open daily dawn until dusk

Cost: Free

Universally Accessible: Yes, the lighthouse is universally accessible but the jetty may not be universally accessible

Dog Friendly: Yes

Website: http://scituatehistoricalsociety.org/light/

Summary: Built in 1810, Old Scituate Light is the 11th lighthouse lit in Massachusetts. The lighthouse is on the registry of historic landmarks in Massachusetts and is reportedly open for tours during certain periods of time during the year (see link above for more info). A rock jetty and rocky beachhead is a popular spot for sunrise watchers and tourists. The lighthouse has a rich history dating back to the early 1800s.

New England has no shortage of lighthouses and breath taking views of seascapes. In fact, due to the plethora of beautiful destinations along the water, some destinations seem to get overlooked. Old Lighthouse in Scituate, MA, is one of these overlooked destinations.

Built in 1810 for $4,000, Old Scituate Light played an important, but little known, role in the War Of 1812. After observing two British barges approaching the Scituate harbor, Abigail and Rebecca Bates, the daughters of the original keeper of the lighthouse (Simeon Bates) hid among a cluster of cedar trees which were once prominent in the area and played their fife and drum in an attempt to ward off the would be attackers. The two girls created such a loud din the barges were said to have retreated fearing an army was preparing for their attack. Their efforts are said to have saved Scituate from being sacked as there was, in reality, no standing army ready for a British attack. The girls went on to become known as the “American Army of Two.”

The 25 foot lighthouse (70 feet above sea level) has a natural/emplaced foundation. The light is a replicated lantern and the keeper does stay in the attached home. A bell, perhaps more for decor than function, stands outside the housekeeper’s residence. The lighthouse keeper is a teacher at nearby Marshfield High School.

There is also a memorial dedicated to the grounding of the Etrusco and the rescue efforts from that accident. On March 16, 1956, the ship came aground at Cedar Point during the St. Patrick’s Day Blizzard (it is New England after all). After the grounding of the freighter, five Scituate residents (all members of Scituate’s Civil Defense Communications Team) sprang into action and, despite blizzard conditions, kept in communication with the Coast Guard, providing key details and information to the Coast Guard. The Coast Guard would eventually rescue all 30 men from the grounded ship.

The surrounding grounds of the lighthouse provide for great photo opportunities.

The highlight of the lighthouse and the surrounding area is the beautiful views it offers which are especially spectacular during sunrise and sunset

As I was about to pack up and head to my next destination, I noticed this group of painted rocks with hopeful messages. Many of them seemed to have a special personal meaning. But, I think we call can derive some inspiration from their messages.

And, of course, my favorite message


Heroes Are Everywhere (Westfield, MA)

Location: corners of Taylor and Hedges Ave, Westfield, MA

Summary: Massachusetts based artists Shannon Chiba and Sarah Kinne honors the heroes of the Coronavirus pandemic with a mural in Westfield, MA that incorporates many of the places and things the area is known for.

Heroes come in all shapes, sizes and backgrounds. The “Heroes Are Everywhere” in Westfield, MA, pays tribute to the different heroes in our midst. And, especially if you’re from the area, you may notice many little tributes to the city.

The mural, which is painted on both sides of the Columbia Greenway Rail Trail Tunnel, includes paintings of doctors,

Laborers

And everyone else lending a helping hand to others during these difficult times regardless of their age or size.

If you look closely, you may see such fixtures of western MA such as a black bear, the Whip City Whip Museum (the prominent brick building in the painting), the Great River bridges, the Westfield River and other staples of life in western MA such as blooming flowers and a birdhouse. The roof of the tunnel shows 4 F-15 jets buzzing by which is a common sight for anyone living near the Westfield based Barnes Air National Guard Base.

The tunnel where the mural is painted, which was painted in 2020 by Massachusetts based artists Shannon Chiba and Sarah Kinne, is part of the Columbia Greenway Rail Trail which is a popular spot for cyclists, hikers and joggers.

Hopefully, as time passes on, there will not be a need for murals like this.


Pink Flamingos (Boston, MA)

Date Of Visit: March 27, 2021

Location: Boston Seaport Common, 85 Northern Ave, Boston, MA

Cost: Free

Hours: Open to the public 24 hours a day until March 30

Summary: nearly 2,000 pink flamingos have been set up at the Boston Seaport Common until March 30

Flamingos have invaded Boston.

Over 1,900 flamingos (some of them a little tipsy) have been planted at the Boston Seaport as a way to brighten up the area and make people smile. This fly by night installation, which is the work of Massachusetts-based developer WS Development, won’t last long though. The birds are expected to stay at their location at the Seaport Common through Tuesday, March 30. Then, they are migrating to the Street Chestnut Hill (MA) and Market Street Lynfield (MA) from April 1-12.

Contrary to popular opinion, these flamingos are not new to the area. In fact, these flamingos have a long history in MA. Don Featherstone designed the first flamingos for Leominster based Union Products in 1957.

They won’t be here for long! So make sure to flock to the Seaport before they fly away!


Yarnstorm (Tower Hill Botanic Hill, Boylston, MA)

Date Of Visit: March 20,2021

Location: Tower Hill Botanic Garden, 11 French Drive, Boylston, MA (about an hour northwest of Boston, MA or 1 hour north of Providence, RI)

Dates Of Exhibit: January 16-March 31, 2021

Hours: Open Daily, 10am–5pm (Tower Hill is closed on Thanksgiving, December 24, December 25, December 31, and January 1)

Cost: (all tickets must be purchased online at their website for a specific timed entry but visitors can stay as late as they wish)

Members: FREE (must reserve ticket)
Adults: $16
Seniors (65+): $11
Youth (6-18): $6
Children 5 and under: Free (must reserve ticket)

Dogs $7 (dogs are not allowed in the Yarnstorm grounds but there are trails they are allowed on)

Parking: there are about 100 plus free parking spots

Universally Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes (dogs are not at Yarnstorm, but dogs are only allowed on the trails outside of the garden)

Summary: 40 artists knitted a variety of designs in the garden areas of Tower Hill Botanic Garden

Website: https://www.towerhillbg.org/

New England is known for its stormy weather. But, there was a very different kind of storm at Tower Hill gardens. Yarnstorming, often referred to as “graffiti knitting” or “yarn bombing” is an art form that uses knitted and crocheted yarn as art instead of paint or water colors.

More than 25 works of art and over 2,000 pom poms were draped upon benches, trees, statues and poles around the garden.

I was able to use my 35 mm lens for these photos and I really like the way the colors popped and the crispness of the shots from the lens. It’s technically not a prime lens since it is an 18-35 mm (1.8). But it’s much easier to lug around than a telephoto.

Some of these artistic displays have signs next to the displays. These signs had bar codes you could scan with your cellphone to get more information about the display and the artist who made the display.

Spring was in the air and in the yarn at Tower Hill Botanic Garden’s Yarnstorm event.

Forty artists contributed to the artistic Yarnstorm exhibit at Tower Hill. The designs ranged from the colorful

to the creative

There were also some famous people along the trails.

This display, made in honor of the late Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, included her answer to “when will there be enough women on the Supreme Court?”

Some of my favorite exhibits were along the stairwell near the edge of the gardens.

But it’s hard to choose just one from the colorful garden.

The knitted art isn’t just on the trails outside of the botanic garden. Castor and Pullox were also dressed up for the event.

Just a friendly reminder that if you do go don’t forget to wear your hat and gloves. Because you never know what the weather will be like in New England!


Ice In The Village (Mystic, CT)

Date Of Event: March 6, 2021

Location: Olde Mystick Village, 27 Coogan Boulevard, Stonington, CT

Summary: Ice sculptures, ice scultpors and costumed visitors converged on the grounds of Olde Mystick Village

Don’t let the rising temperatures fool you. Winter is still very much in swing in New England. To celebrate the waning days of the winter season, Olde Mystick Village held its Ice In The Village festival. The event included over a dozen ice sculptures, two ice sculpting demonstrations and a there were even few characters straight out of Disney.

Mystic Village is known for its plethora of specialty shops and eateries. But the highlight last weekend were the ice sculptures that were installed around the village.

The sculptures ranged from artistic renderings of the animal kingdom

To carvings of food

But many of the sculptures were related to the businesses they were located in front of.

Some of the sculptures seemed to have a certain theme that fit in with the area and its history. Known for its seaport (the Mystic Seaport Museum is just a short distance from the village) Mystic has a rich nautical history. This anchor was a perfect symbol for the area.

This sculpture was popular with people who wanted to take their photos in the opening of the ice carving.

Perhaps the most popular part of the festival were the two ice sculpting demonstrations at the Ice In The Village event.

People were encouraged to wear their costumes and, fitting with the theme of ice and other cold things, Anna and Elsa made a surprise appearance.

Olde Mystick Village is a dog friendly venue and there were lots of dogs at the village during my visit. One of the dogs I saw there, Cocoa, a 9 year old Chocolate Lab, brought her own toy to the festival.

It is unclear whether they will hold this festival again in the upcoming years. But if they do I’ll see you there!


2021 Salem’s So Sweet (Salem, MA)

Date Of Event: February 6, 2021

Location: Salem, MA

Hours:Visible 24 hours a day, until they Feb 14

Cost: Free

Parking: Metered street parking is available and there are two big parking garages on New Liberty St and Congress St

The Downtown Garage (New Liberty St) costs $1.50 per hour.

The Waterfront Garage (Congress St) costs $.75 per hour on weekdays and $1.50  per hour on weekends

Both garages operate from 7:00 AM to 10:00 PM Sunday through Wednesday and from 7:00 AM to 2:00 AM Thursday through Saturday.

Public Transportation: The MBTA’s Commuter Rail has a stop which deposits its passengers right at Washington St. $15 for a round trip ticket from North Station (fares vary depending upon where you leave from and where you are going)

MBTA Commuter Rail

Universally Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Summary: Over a dozen ice sculptures located throughout Salem, MA, are illuminated during the evening.

Website: http://salemmainstreets.org/festivals/salem-so-sweet/

The snow, ice and cold weather didn’t prevent countless revelers from heading to Salem for the annual Salem So Sweet ice sculpture celebration. In fact, it made for the ideal conditions.

For the past 19 years, Salem has been brightening up the winter days with a ice sculpture festival, highlighted by a special illumination show on the day they arrive.

Much like everything this past tear, everything seemed different and not just because of the obvious. The crowds were smaller, there was a less jovial feel to the event and it wasn’t as festive as in the past. While smaller crowds can be a plus for visitors and especially for visitors with a camera, it didn’t feel right. I’d rather wait and even jostle for a photograph and feel a more fun atmosphere. I suppose that is to be expected these days though. The crowds seemed to ebb and then gather sporadically. But it did seem to be a much smaller crowd this year.

The sculptures were delivered around noontime on the 6th. But, the celebration really heats up during the late afternoon and early evening. From 5 pm to 9 pm on Saturday the sculptures were illuminated. They are only lit up for these 4 hours. So it does attract a busy night time crowd. Although, of course, with most bars closed or operating with heavy restrictions, the night crowd was noticeably smaller.

Unfortunately, the ice sculptures are removed on Valentine’s Day, February 14. So you’ll have to wait until next year, when things are expected to be closer to “normal” to see the sculptures in person.

There were also fewer ice sculptures this year than in the past. Last year there were 26 sculptures. This year 17 sculptures adorned the streets of Salem. However, a few of them were either damaged, had melted substantially because of the warmer weather and sunlight during the day or, in one case, completely broken.

But, I did my best to photograph the sculptures that were available.

I have listed the ice sculptures as they are listed on the map at the events’s website: http://salemmainstreets.org/festivals/salem-so-sweet/

I have skipped a few that were too damaged or completed destroyed and one I forgot about because it was too far away (# 17 “Bakery”)

1 “Owl And Moon”

This owl, which was located near Witch City Wicks on Essex St probably looked better before it was illuminated since the sun helped to melt it and obscure some of its features. That was a common theme as you will see in some of these photos. It’s a trade off. Either take the photos of the sculptures when they are fresh and haven’t melted and haven’t been mutilated or wait until the are illuminated when they look, in my estimation, much prettier. I may take photos of the sculptures before and after illumination next year to avoid this from happening again.

2 The World

If you attend the ice sculpture festival each year, you may notice some of the same companies or organizations use the same type of sculptures each year like this sculpture also on Essex St. The Journeymasters, a travel agency company, usually has a sculpture of a globe with a star or some other kind of fanciful design around it.

3 “Thanking All Alumni On The Front Lines”

This sculpture, sponsored by Salem State University whose sports teams are named the Vikings, was located on Essex St near the Bewitched statue at Lappin Park. It was dedicated to the front line and first responders who graduated from the university’

4 Kids In Snow

Located in front of Salem Cycle on Washington St, this ice sculpture depicts two children sledding.

5 Fish

This sculpture of a fish was appropriately located next to Turner’s Seafood on Church St

6 Joan Of Arc Sword And Shield

Located outside of Coon’s Card & Gift Shop on Essex, this sculpture was dedicated to Joan of Arc.

7 Sweets

This sculpture, located on Front St, had an actual rose near the top of the sculpture. It also accurately depicts how, while the sculpture look even more stunning at night, they can be much more difficult to photograph the darker it gets even with a tripod and careful photoshop editing. It wasn’t even that late either. I think it was close to 6:30 pm when this photo was taken. But it does get dark pretty early in these parts during the winter.

8 Rocking Horse

Nothing anything different or weird about this rocking horse sculpture which was located on Front St? Don’t lose your head trying to think.

Yes, this rocking horse is missing it’s neck and head. Although it was a little warm (by winter in New England standards) and the sun was beating on the sculptures during the day, this sculpture’s head didn’t melt off. It was almost certainly the act of vandalism or damaged during delivery.

11 2021 Picture Frame

Located on Central St, this sculpture was famous for people and sometimes their pets posing in together

12 Gingerbread House

This sculpture, located neat Witch City Mall (formerly Museum Place Mall) on Essex St, looked goof enough to eat.

13 Hello Kitty Phone

Unfortunately, the writing on the wall of the Peabody Essex Museum on Essex St made it a little hard to show all of the features of the cat.

15 Sailboat

This was the only sculpture that wasn’t illuminated. As you can see the sun had caused it to melt quite a bit.

16 Candy

This sculpture was appropriately located across from the oldest candy company in America (Ye Olde Pepper Company) and in front of the House of The Seven Gables, this sculpture depicts a train with a cargo of candy canes.

There were helpful guides at the event to hep you find the sculptures and distribute maps showing where all the sculptures are located, although most people used the map on their map from the event’s website. Some of the helpers got into the spirit of the event.

Although she didn’t say much, Samantha was also dressed up for the event.

Although they weren’t part of the actual event, there was some other decorations that lit up the event.

This house on Derby St is famous for decorating its property for major holidays and events.

You may notice a little critter walking up the pathway. When I was photographing the decorations I noticed this little animal approaching me. Having seen cats there during previous photo shoots at this location, I thought nothing of it until it got right in front of me. Yeah it’s a skunk. Fortunately there was a fence between us and the skunk didn’t spray. He or she just turned around and walked back the way he or she came from. It was a very close call!

The famous Jerry the dinosaur of Salem.

The city of Salem has also put up year round lighting displays that made the event even more Decorative than usual.

And this business on Derby St got into the Valentine’s Day spirit.

I look forward to photographing this extravaganza next year when things are more “normal.” But hopefully not too normal!

You can view photos from previous Salem’s Too Sweet Events that I have photographed in the past by clicking on the links below:

2017 Salem’s So Sweet: https://newenglandnomad2015.com/2017/02/13/salems-so-sweet-salem-ma/

2018 Salem’s So Sweet: https://newenglandnomad2015.com/2018/02/13/16th-annual-salems-so-sweet-salem-ma/

2019 Salem’s So Sweet: https://newenglandnomad2015.com/2019/02/14/salems-so-sweet-2019-salem-ma/


Wizzil Story Walk (Salem Commons, Salem, MA)

Date Of Event: March 28, 2020

Location: Salem, Commons, Washington Square, Salem, MA

Universally Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Summary, 18 placards tell the story of Wizzil, a horrible hag who wants to add some excitement to her life.  Without giving away too many spoilers, her parrot suggests she amuse herself by making someone else suffer.  Hilarity ensues.

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It definitely seems like this whole “socially distancing” thing is working.  During my quick, socially distanced visit to Salem, MA, there was hardly a soul in the area.  In fact, many people were probably curled up with a book.

Salem Public Library has brought the best of both worlds to the Salem Commons.  The Storywalk, which was based on the children’s book Wizzil by William Steig and illustrated by Quentin Blake, was created so that families could enjoy the outdoors while still reading and laughing as a family.

The 18 signs are placed within the socially distanced spaces recommended by the government.  They were prepared by the Children’s Room staff at the Salem Public Library.

If you do go, there are some ground rules.  First, you must give each visitor a 6 foot zone of space for social distancing purposes.  Visitors are also discouraged from touching the signs.

You can read the story below.  I have I have posted the photos of the placards in the order of how they were placed at the common.  You may have to expand the screen to read the lettering since it is so small.  Or, better yet, go to the Commons and read it for yourself!

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Below are some photos of Salem Saturday morning.  It was very desolate and I was half expecting a zombie or some other undead being to come around one of the corners.  I was in Salem after all.  It was just me and this very hungry squirrel.

 

 


“The Fisherman” (Cape Cod Canal, Buzzards Bay, Cape Cod, MA)

Date Of Visit: January 1, 2020

Location: Cape Cod Canal, 70 Main St, Buzzards Bay, Bourne, MA

Hours: The statue is accessible everyday,  24 hours a day, although the hours the canal is accessible may be different

Cost: Free

Parking: there is a parking lot for about 100 or more cars at the base of the trail of the canal.  There are also various parking areas along the canal.

Summary: Dedicated on the 100th anniversary of the birth of the Cape Cod Canal, “The Fisherman” sculpture of Stan Gibbs stands next to the main parking lot to the entrance of the Cape Cod Canal trail.

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Buzzards Bay has long been known for the fishing enthusiasts who travel far and wide to try their luck in the waters of the Cape Cod Canal.  Now, there is a statue dedicated to the people who fish in these waters.  But, the 10 foot tall bronze statue sculpted by Cape Cod native and resident David Lewis is actually dedicated to one particular fisherman.

Legendary hunter, trapper, fisherman and lure-making expert Stan Gibbs, a frequent visitor to the Canal, is the impetus for this statue.  In fact, the people who decided to build this statue were member of the Stan Gibbs Fisherman’s Classic Tournament, an annual fishing contest held each September named in his honor.

Originally from Easton, Gibbs moved to Sagamore, a town in Bourne, MA, and just short distance from the canal.  It was there that Gibbs developed his love and skill of angling.  He would use his skill and knowledge of fishing to create lures, called Gibbs Lures, later in his life.

Dedicated in 2016, as part of the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Canal, the statue shows Gibbs with two fish slung over his right shoulder and a fishing rod in his left.  A tablet rests on the block the statue stands on.  Engraved in it is the following:

THE FISHERMAN

A tribute to past present and future striped bass fisherman and the great cape cod canal.  Dedicated to local fishing legend Stan Gibbs 

 

Perhaps most importantly to the residents of the area, the statue didn’t cost the tax payers one dime.  The $80,000 price tag for the statue and surrounding area was funded through 7 years of fund raising.

The next time you stop by the canal, make sure to say “hi” to Stan!

As an addendum to my post, I apologize for my absence from WordPress.  I have been moving and anyone who has done this knows the time and effort involved in this process.  Things have settled down now and I will post more frequently.  I hope you all continue to view my content.  Since it is easier and less time consuming, I have been posting on my Facebook page regularly.  The link to my Facebook page is listed below.  Please connect with me on Facebook to see more content in a more timely fashion.  Thank you!

New England Nomad Facebook Link