Category Archives: Salem

10th Annual Salem Arts Festival – Part III (Salem, MA)

Dates Of Event: June 1-3, 2018 (event usually takes place the first weekend in June)

Location: Front St, Old Town Hall, Salem, MA

Cost: Free

Parking: Street parking, which is limited during festivals, costs .75 an hour (4 hour limit) and there are several parking lots and garages.  You can find more information about parking in Salem here.

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Location: Artist’s Row, Salem, MA

Fun Facts:

  • Salem (in Hebrew) means “peace”
  • If you do visit (and shop) in Salem, don’t forget your re-usable shopping bag (they ditched plastic bags earlier this year)

Related Posts: 10th Annual Salem Arts Festival – Part I

10th Annual Salem Arts Festival – Part II

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What would an arts festival be without…art?

Well,  in addition to the musical artists, acrobats, flamenco dancers and various other entertainers, there was also lots of art on display at the Old Salem Town Hall during the festival.

All of the artists featured at this display, with one exception, were from Massachusetts and overwhelming from Salem or in the Salem MA area.

The exhibit was free of charge and there was lots of different art to entertain even the harshest art critic.  In fact, there was everything from clocks and photographs to glass sculptures and a paper mache work of art in the exhibit.  Much like

This clock called The Slow Procession of Luna was made out of oil, wood and clay.  It was  created by Gardeneer, MA artist Melinda Goodhue.

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Grasshopper Junction, Arizona was painted by Lynn, MA, artist Heather Stewart.

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Salem resident Denny Tentindo painted VWII.  It is an oil on wood painting.

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Remembering Georgie by Heather M Morris of Belmont, MA, is an acrylic on canvas work.

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Urban 3,  a photograph on canvas, was made by Chrissa Markos, a Manchester (MA) resident.

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Urban 1, also by Chrissa Markos is a photograph on canvas.

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The Annunciation is an acrylic on board work of art by Lynn, MA, artist Daniel Parziale

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This creation, made out of recycled magazines by Betsy Silverman, is called Sister Act.

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Dancing With The Stars is an oil painting by Nancy Satin.

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This work, called Dragon: noun, was made out of a dictionary.  It was created by Jacob Crawford.  His work of art won the Deborah Greel Honrary Award

 

Edison & His Children is a digital collage by Edward Morneau.

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Engaged, by Daniel Breslin, was made out of found objects on wood.

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The Controler, by Jack Walsh, is made of found objects.

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Jacob Crawford created Rainbow Chameleon with paint swatches.

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Nathaniel Hare-Thorne was sculpted by Swampscott, MA, resident Diane McAlisterr

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Marie by Taylor Popek is made oout of acrylic yarn and polyfil.

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I love all of the Salem references in this Salem Cat sculpture (you may see the Bewitched statue, Old Town Hall, the Peabody Essex Museum and other attractions on Essex St) and the foliage on the trees puts me in the fall spirit.  This scupture is an acrylic painted ceramic piece by Salem resident Beki Ferrari.

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Salem Derby Cat by Beki Ferrari is another acrylic painted ceramic sculpture.  You may also see other Salem attraction from Derby St (The House of the Seven Gables) on this sculpture.  Of course, I would have to say this was my favorite.

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Through View is an oil painting by Boxford, MA, resident Tom Bailey.

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Emergence  is an encaustic (“hot wax” painting) mixed media work of art by Amesbury, MA. artist Deb E. Goldberg.

Diane McAlister sculpted this work called Bride of Frankenmummy.

 

 

 

 

Crow is a clay sculpture by Billie-Joe Gauley of Salem.

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Girabbit is another clay sculpture by by Billie-Joe Gauley.

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Great Egret by Racket Shreve is a watercolor painting.

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Brit Eating a Salad is an oil on wood painting by Salem artist Amanda Dunham.

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NorEaster is a glass work of art by Matthew Cronin.

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Autumn is another glass sculpture by Matthew Cronin.

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Ipswich artist Jen Boisvert carved sculpted this piece called Figure.

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This untitled work is a mixed media on wood work of art by Sara Ashodian.

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Deb E. Goldberg made this encaustic and mixed media work of art called Departure.

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Ocean V is an acrylic and refined linseed oil painting by Melissa Pasdon of Salem, MA.

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This untitled work is a painted wood sculpture by Heather Stewart.

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Blue Fish  by Elizabeth Visco of Lynnfield, MA, is a Raku (A type of Japanese pottery) stoneware work of art.

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Robert Crooker of Wakefield ,MA, made this acrylic painting.

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There was also fun for those who people and dogs who wanted to cool down and splash their friend or sister.

 

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While I was photographing all of these great works of art, I saw a dog that had similar markings to my mom’s new dog.  So, I knew I had to photograph her.  June (or “Junebug”) is a 15 month old mixed breed dog.

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During my walk back to my car I met Glenna who looked adorable resting on her rock.

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And, proving that I do indeed visit Salem frequently (one of the last times I visited someone say “Hi Nomad”), I saw Cookie who I had I photographed earlier this year and also again during the festival.

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10th Annual Salem Arts Festival – Part II (Salem, MA)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Location: Front St, Old Town Hall, Salem, MA

Dates Of Event: June 1-3, 2018 (event usually takes place the first weekend in June)

Cost: Free

Parking: Street parking, which is limited during festivals, costs .75 an hour (4 hour limit) and there are several parking lots and garages.  You can find more information about parking in Salem here.

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Location: Artist’s Row, Salem, MA

Fun Fact: Salem (in Hebrew) means “peace”

Related Post: 10th Annual Salem Arts Festival – Part I

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Murals weren’t the only types of art on display at the Salem Arts Festival.

In addition to the amazing art on display and family friendly activities I highlighted in Part I of this series, there were several bands, dancers and other entertainers who set up on the stairs of the Old Town Hall on Front St.

All of the performers were very talented and entertaining (view the videos below to see for yourself)

All of the performers had some ties to New England, and in many cases the Salem area.

Liz Bills And The Change are from Haverhill, MA (about 40 minutes north of Salem), rocked the alley next tot he Coffee Brewhouse.  Great presence and style.

Wellesley (MA) native and Berklee College of Music graduate, Sarah Blacker and the New England Groove Association was another great performer.

She even made a new young fan.

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One of the things I really enjoyed about the performers was the variety of music and entertainment.  In fact, I actually heard and enjoyed some music from bands that I never thought I would be into.  One of those bands was the Boston-based Outrageous Fortune Trio Jug Band mixed jazz and blues in their repertoire.  I particularly enjoyed their version of “Come Together.”  He actually used the cane in the photo below as an instrument.

I loved the Emma Sundvik & Hunter Burgamy Jazz Band.

I also had a surprise encounter with a friend from my gym.  Anthony (“Antonio”) plays the Flamenco guitar for Boston Flamenco.  Anastasia and Anna Maria joined him in his performance.

At the end of their performance, Anastasia gave some of the visitors a lesson in Flamenco dancing.

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The entertainment was not just limited to music, though.  One of my favorite forms of entertainment was the dancing  of the Salem YMCA Fly Kidz.  These kids can dance!

And what would an arts festival in Salem be without a visit from Dark Follies?

Dark Follies incorporates stunts (a straitjacket escape artist), dancers and other magical entertainment into their acts.

The kids loved the Boston Opera Outreach Troupe.  It was great seeing little children embracing this music.

If that was not enough, the Aerial Artistry of Baechtold & Abel (and their college understudy) took center stage on Front St.  Their acrobatics were so graceful.  But, what people may overlook is the strength these acrobats must have to be able to support their own and their partner’s body.

Speaking of Front St, there were “tiny dancers”, or more accurately a tiny stage with real life sized dancers performing.

There were also fairies who blew bubbles, read stories and danced with the children (and a few adults).

There was also a “Poets In The Round” poetry reading event.

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The street performers who you might usually see only during the Halloween season also came out to partake in the festivities and take photos with their fans.  Or, just take in the scenes with a, uh….friend. It was like Halloween in June!

Of course, what would an art festival be without dogs?

Rocko looked cool rocking his bee wings with his doting humans.

Igor (the Hairless dog) was one of the more unique dogs I have photographed.  You may notice his two different colored eyes.

Below are some videos of the performers from the art festival.  Sorry for the “shaky cam” in some of the videos, particularly those taken at the end of the day.

And, believe it or not, there is at least one more installment of photos from the art festival coming soon!


10th Annual Salem Arts Festival – Part I (Salem, MA)

Dates Of Event: June 1-3, 2018 (event usually takes place the first weekend in June)

Cost: Free

Parking: Street parking, which is limited during festivals, costs .75 an hour (4 hour limit) and there are several parking lots and garages.  You can find more information about parking in Salem here.

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Location: Artist’s Row, Salem, MA

Fun Fact: Salem (in Hebrew) means “peace”

Related Post: Artists Row

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The 10th Annual Salem Arts festivals was the place to bee last weekend.

As part of their Bee To Brick awareness campaign, the festival posted colorful bees along Artist Row and Front St.  The purpose of the campaign is to raise awareness of these pollinators as they are crucial to our ecosystem, and, in some areas, in danger of being depleted.  So, the next time you see a black and yellow insect don’t swat it, just shoo it away!

The “bees” were made out of plastic bottles and other recyclable materials.

 

But, the bees were only one highlight of this event. The three day (I attended 2 of the days), was full of performers, arts and crafts and various family friendly events.  The weather was picture perfect with sunny skies for all to enjoy (and I had the burn to prove it).  In fact, there was so much to see and do, I am going to have to post about this festival in parts (probably 3 or 4 parts).  In part I I will focus on some of the events on Artist’s Row.

I arrived early Saturday before all of the events started.  In a matter of hours this path (Artist’s Row – a haven for the artistic and lovers of artistic expression) would be packed with performers, vendors and revelers.

 

Along Artist’s Row, there were lots of events for kids, adults and even dogs to enjoy.  Kids could get wings (part of “bee to brick” theme), give a high five to, by far, the tallest attendee of the festival, Jasper, “King Of The Rag Dolls.”  There were also tables were kids could make hats, draw in a Salem Coloring Book and even make a Happy Father’s day card.

 

There were also vendors set up along the row and on Front St.  One of the vendors I met was the talented and friendly Joey, owner of Salem Pet Photography.

 

This won’t be the last time you see a photo of Joey in my series of blog posts for this festival.

There is so much to see and do in Salem.  But, fear not, if you get lost on Artist’s Row there is a sign post to direct you in the correct direction.

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The main attraction on Artist’s Row was the annual Mural Slam.

An artist or team of artists were given a photo to recreate as a mural.  Just seeing the progression of the murals is amazing.  It is incredible to see just how the recreations are just as good, if not better, than the original photographs.  The deadline for the murals was 8 p.m.on Sunday and I could not stay that long.  I took photos of the murals in their latest stages just before I left.  I will have to go back at some point to view all of the finished murals.  You can find more updated photos from the Mural Slam here.

 

Casey Stanberry, an architect from Cambridge (MA), was tasked with one of the hardest tasks; painting each street, intersection, building and other object from an overhead view of Salem.  The painstaking project took him two full days to complete.

 

“Caw-Caw” was painted by Madison Economides.

 

“Day Dream” was painted by Amanda Beard Garcia and Mariah Leah

 

Bruce Orr, who has worked as an art therapist, art teacher, painter and illustrator, painted this work.

 

Mike Grimaldi worked on this mural

 

Boston based artist Sophy Tuttle painted this beetiful mural.

 

This mural was painted by the Salem Academy Slammers (students from the Salem Academy Charter School in Salem, MA)

 

Kate Holloway painted this mural

 

Dan Belisle, a self taught artist from the North Shore of MA, painted this mural.

 

This “community abstract painting” (visitors could add their own efforts to this work before the actual artist finished it up) called “Geometry” was painted by James Eric Rogers (with help from the community of course)

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Liz Sullivan, who considers herself an “artist turned graffiti writer”, painted this mural.

I also came across a four legged lover of the arts: Rosie, a 17 month old Terrier Hound mix.

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Stay tuned for my Part II from the Salem Arts Festival which will include many of the performance artists on Front St. (and probably a few more dogs)!

 

 


Lady Of Salem – 2018 (Salem, MA)

Dates Of Event: June 1-3 (during Salem Arts Festival)

Location: Throughout Downtown Salem

Parking: Street parking, which is limited during festivals, costs .75 an hour (4 hour limit) and there are several parking lots and garages.  You can find more information about parking in Salem here.

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Highlights: A collection of figureheads displayed throughout downtown Salem

Tip(s): While most of the figureheads are located on Essex St, follow the red historical tour line throughout the city to find the remaining figureheads

Related Post: Lady Of Salem – 2016 (Salem, MA)

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In observation of the Salem Arts Festival, the Salem Historical Society decided to send out the ladies of Salem.

The Ladies Of Salem are a collection of figureheads constructed by a variety of artists.

While these figures have been displayed before (see related post above), when I did photograph these figureheads in the past there weren’t as many on display as theere were this past weekend. Some of them were missing (they had been destroyed or stolen off their mounted displays) and  others looked a little roughed up.  Besides I was in Salem to photograph the Arts Festivals (posts on this event soon).  So, I thought I would photograph all of the figureheads in their current state.  And, much to my delight, they all looked as though they may have been touched up a bit and the were all actually there.  Since they were posted rather high on lamp posts, a ladder or cherry picker would have came in handy.  But it was still fun photographing all of the figureheads.  Plus, it gave me a chance to photograph some dogs along the way.

There appeared to be a few figureheads on display that either were not posted or I may have missed in my earlier visit in 2016.  The tricky thing about looking for these figureheads is there wasn’t a map or website with the locations of the figureheads’ locations.  This made it more difficult but also more fun.

The one tip I was given by the helpful workers at the tourism office is to follow the red line which represents the Salem Heritage Trail and includes many of the famous historical haunts in Salem.  The trail is only about a mile or so and there are lots of fun and interesting things to see along the trail.

More than half of the 21 Ladies of Salem are displayed along the Essex Street Pedestrian Mall. The other figureheads may be found on Derby and Washington streets, as well as one that is posted at Old Town Hall.

The figureheads are put on display from time to time, especially for different events such as the arts festival or the maritime arts festival.

The artists were given a blank canvas on a 33-inch-tall-by-14-inch-wide and 14-inch-deep figurehead molded of a hard yet lightweight fibrous material. Before the mounting board is attached, the figureheads weigh only 7 pounds.

I wanted to take closeups of the figureheads’ faces to show off the details of them.  I also like to think of them as being in deep thought, gazing off to the sea or some other distant place.

Most of the figureheads are dressed or painted to represent the sponsors of the figurehead.  For instance, the figurehead that is sponsored by Essex’s N.Y. Pizza & Deli in the Salem Museum Place Mall (aka Witch City Mall), has a crown and “I Love Pizza” t-shirt on.  You may also notice stickers of bees on the signs of the figureheads.  The bees are part of the “bee proud” awareness promotion for pride month.

Figureheads on ships were said to have strong magical or religious significance.  As you may notice from the photos below, women were largely used as the shapes of the figureheads.  They were supposed to be used to appeal to the ocean gods and spirits and cause these spirits and gods to be stricken by their beauty, enabling the ships to proceed without any interference from these potential evil doers.

The Phoenicians are said to have been the first people to use figureheads, from around 2500 to 539 BC, when they adorned the prows of their oared galleys with wooden carvings that depicted animals, birds, dieties, and serpents.

The Egyptians and Chinese instituted the practice of painting eyes, known as Oculi, on the bows of their vessels, so that they may find their way across the oceans.

Catholic countries, such as Spain, used religious figureheads, such as Jesus Christ and the Virgin Mary, in the hopes that these figureheads would bring them safety and fortune in their voyages.

However, the “golden age” of figureheads is said to be between 1790 to about 1825.  During this time frame many warships and merchant ships built in North America and England were decorated with these artful figureheads.

But, the figureheads I found were built much more recently.

The first figurehead I spotted is by the artist Shalimar.

This figurehead was made by the artist Demetrius Lacroix.

This figurehead, which I did not include in my earlier post about the Lady Of Salem figureheads, was sculpted by Alicia Irick Cohen.  The figurehead does have some obvious wear and tear, unfortunately.

This figurehead was created by the YMCA/Girls Today Program.

The artist for this figurehead is Amberlynn Narvie.

Niko Papadimitriou is the artist for this figurehead.

This figurehead was created by Vonn Bittercup.

The artist for this figurehead is John Devine.

Kenneth Glover is the artist for this figurehead.

This blue faced beauty was created by Mr. Bleckley’s 5th grade student artists

Dori Phillips painted this figurehead.

This colorfully painted figurehead was made by Cynthia Mikula Smiszek.

Karen Lamesa and Tina Armstrong painted this figurehead.

Jeanne Pare-Kapnis painted this figurehead.

Sheila Billings made this figurehead.

The figurehead below was crafted by Jeanne Pare

The next figurehead was painted by Jill Pabich.

This figurehead was painted by Kerry May Killam.

Jeanne Pare-Kapnis painted this figurine that was located on Derby St.

Mary-Ellen Smiley painted this figurehead which was located in the Old Town Hall near the Essex Pedestrian Walkway.

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I could not locate a sign with the name of the artist for this figurehead.  Unlike most of the other figureheads, this one was located in a store on  Essex St (Witch Tee;s)

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Although not part of the Lady Of Salem display, there are additional figureheads in the Peabody Essex Museum, also on Essex St.  You would have to pay an entrance fee to the museum to view them.  But I have a photos of them below from my visit October 8 of last year.

Besides being the weekend of the arts festival, the weather was perfect for visitors and their dogs.  There were lots of dogs enjoying the figureheads and the festival.  Below are a few of the cute four legged visitors I met during my visit.

Brody is an adorable 10 year old mixed breed dog.

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Don’t blink or you might miss Wink, a 13 year old Pomeranian and Brody’s sibling.

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Aster, who is as handsome as the flower he is named after, is a Border Collie and Australian mix.

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Luna is a 3 year old Chihuahua.  He has very cute features.

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I love Lance’s fur and and sweet nature.  Lance is a 9 year old Standard Poodle.

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Who doesn’t love Golden Retrievers?  Not anyone I would want to know.  Bowen, named after a wharf in Newport, Rhode Island, is a 3 month old Golden Retriever.

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I am not sure how long the Ladies will be on display, although they may have all been taken down after the arts festival which ended Sunday (June 3).  I am pretty sure you may see them again during the summer, specifically during the 30th Annual Salem Maritime Arts Festival August 4th and 5th of this year.  It’s a pretty good bet you may see me there!

Also, keep an eye out for my photographs from the 10th Annual Salem Arts Festival from the first weekend of June which I will be posting in parts since there was so much to show you all!


SCAM (Salem, MA)

Date Of Visits: October 21, 2017 & February 10, 2018

Location: Essex St, Salem MA (shares the same entrance as Witch Tee’s at 173 Essex St)

Hours: Closed Mon – Thu, Fri: 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sat & Sun: 12-7 (Hours may vary depending on the season)

Cost: Free

Parking: Street parking is accessible throughout Salem and at the parking garages on Congress St and New Liberty St

Handicapped Accessible: The first floor is handicapped accessible but the only way to the second floor is by using a stairwell

Dog Friendly: Yes

Website: SCAM

Highlights: art made by local artists

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Beware! There is a scam in Salem.

But this scam does not involve some shady Nigerian Prince or a bug with your Windows operating system. No, this is an entirely different kind of scam.

SCAM (The Salem Collective of Artists and Musicians) has a wide collection of unique art from artists in Salem and the neighboring areas. I wen there on a whim. It was a busy weekend in Salem just before Halloween. So, I thought I would duck out from the foot traffic and stop in, And, was I glad I did!

I originally visited SCAM in October, 2017. The decor did have a Halloween or spooky theme in some areas and an early Christmas themed work of art.

The entrance way to SCAM is a shared entrance with Witch Tees on the pedestrian walkway on Essex St. Go to the right at the entrance to enter the art museum.

The first floor has a variety of art, novelty items and some merchandise for purchase.

My favorite pieces are the vintage art of celebrities from the past such as the art work with Marlon Brando and Leonard Nimoy. Little known fact: Leonard Nimoy was born in nearby Boston, MA.

I also liked the height chart that corresponded with the height of other celebrities. I was Keanu Reeves! Who knew Lady Gaga was so tiny! I also like how they have Matt Damon’s “crouching height.”

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Most of the art is on the second floor. There is a variety of unique art and innovative items on the second floor of SCAM.

Watch out where you step when you go upstairs!

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That is just one of them more offbeat pieces of art or entertainment at SCAM.

The works of art on the second floor of SCAM are very creative and impressive. Some of the art on display is for sale.

SCAM is not a very big art museum. You can easily go through the building and view all of the art in 20 minutes or so.

From the outside of the building was yet another innovative work of art!

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SCAM changes up their decor and art from time to time. During a recent visit on February 10, I noticed there was a new set up in the front window. I love how they integrate action figures into different locations.

Below is a short video of the display at the front of SCAM.


16th Annual Salem’s So Sweet (Salem, MA)

Date Of Visit: February 10, 2017

Locations: Throughout the city of Salem

Hours:Visible 24 hours a day, until they melt

Cost: Free

Parking:Metered street parking is available and there are two big parking garages on New Liberty St and Congress St

The Downtown Garage (New Liberty St) costs $0.75 per hour.

The Waterfront Garage (Congress St) costs $0.25 per hour.

Both garages operate from 7:00 AM to 10:00 PM Sunday through Wednesday and from 7:00 AM to 2:00 AM Thursday through Saturday.

Public Transportation: The MBTA’s Commuter Rail has a stop which deposits its passengers right at Washington St. $15 for a round trip ticket from North Station (fares vary depending upon where you leave from and where you are going)

MBTA Commuter Rail

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Website: Salem’s So Sweet

Related Post: 2017 Salem’s So Sweet

Highlights; 24 Ice Sculptures that have light fixtures attached to them that light up at night

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What says “Happy Valentine’s Day” like chocolates, champagne and chunks of carved ice? That is what Salem served up this past weekend.

The festivities began Friday, February 9 with a special Salem’s So Sweet chocolate and wine tasting event.

Unfortunately for the sculptures, we experienced a spell of warm weather over the weekend. While it gave people a chance to roam around in t-shirts and, yes in some cases shorts, the 40 to 50 degree weather did not bode will for the ice sculptures. Yes, New England weather is so predictable and cooperative.

Although the sculptures are impressive in the daylight, they really come alive during the afternoon and evening after the lights attached to their stands are turned on. The lights were put on a little before 5 and then I hustled to get all of them photographed before it got too dark.

One of the really great things about the sculptures, besides the obvious beauty and intricacy of them, is that it is great platform for businesses in the area to market themselves in a tasteful and fun way. It is also great for the visitors to learn about businesses, particularly smaller businesses, they may not have been aware of before.

I noticed almost all of the sculptures were different but were in some ways similar to the sculptures they had last year (take notice, Journeymasters). I did notice that they had a certain similar theme with the ice sculptures from last year and this year, such as the sculptures located at the Salem Witch Museum, Bit Bar and Rockafellas.

I am posting the photos of the sculptures in the order they appear on the map from 1 to 24. I will also include a photo of the sculptures before and after they were lit. Not only do the sculptures light up, some of them change colors while they’re lit. I have showed different photos displaying the different colors of the sculptures as well as videos at the bottom to show them in all of their brightness.

The first ice sculpture on the map was located on Essex St near Lappen Park (where the Bewitched statue is). This sculpture didn’t make it to end of the day. Whether it was due to a careless spectator or the result of all of the melting that took place, the top part of the sculpture was not on attached when I came back to photograph it after it was lit.

Universe sponsored by The Journeymasters

Han Solo sponsored by Gulu-Gulu Cage. Rumor has it Han was supposed to be on display during last year’s ice sculpture festival but he didn’t make it there in time. I’m glad he could join us this year.

Snowflake sponsored by Laura Lanes Skin Care.

Tank sponsored by Army Barracks.

Kissing Fish sponsored by Adriatic Restaurant And Bar.

Piggy Bank sponsored by People’s United Bank.

Princess And Frog sponsored by Maria’s Sweet Somethings.

This sculpture did not make it too far into the day either.

Dragon sponsored by Coon’s Card And Gift Shop.

Page The Dog sponsored by Bella Research Group.

Lobsterman sponsored by Turner’s Seafood.

Love Potion #9 sponsored by The Coven’s Cottage, Emporium 32, Modern Millie, Pamplemousse, Salem Trolley and The Trolley Depot.

Basset Hound sponsored by a variety of shops that are part of the Witch City Mall

Cactus sponsored by Peabody Essex Museum.

Super Mario Brothers sponsored by Bit Bar.

Cauldron sponsored by The Salem Witch Museum.

Bakery sponsored by Coffee Time Bake Shop.

Financial Wizard sponsored by Saint Jean’s Credit Union.

Lion sponsored by Jolie Tea Company.

Mug sponsored by Notch Brewery & Taproom.

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Waterfront Hotel sponsored by The Regatta Pub Restaurant at the Salem Waterfront Hotel.

This one made me laugh because while I was photographing it, a child who was with her mother, asked her mom, “What is rum?” Her mom was left speechless.

Rumson’s Rum sponsored by Pirate Dog Brand/Rumson’s Rum.

The Friendship sponsored by The Waite & Pierce National Park Service Information Center and Park Service. This is a sculpture of the boat, The Friendship, that is usually docked by the Pedrick House at Derby Wharf.

To celebrate the 350th anniversary of The House of the Seven Gables, 350th Anniversary was sponsored by House Of The Seven Gables and Ye Olde Pepper Candy Companie.

Of course, with the warmer weather and the special attractions, there were many people walking their dogs. Whenever I go to Salem, which if you read my blog regularly you must know is often, I always see such a wonderful array of dogs and Saturday was no different.

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Meko is a 2.5 year old Schnauzer/Yorkie rescue from Arkansas.

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Augie is a 2 and a half year old Pug.

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Marley is a 12 week old Lab mix.

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Cookie (yes like the Oreo cookie) is a 12 year old Border Collie.

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Ollie is a mixed breed shelter dog.

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Darwin, who was named after Charles Darwin whose boats was named the DHS Beagle.

Below are two videos of two sculptures that had lights on them that changed colors.

Thank you for stopping by and please stop by my Facebook page and consider following me there!


Murals (Salem, MA)

Date Of Visit: October 7, 2017

Location: Congress St, Harbor St, Ward St, Lafayette St, Salem, MA

Cost: Free

Hours: Accessible every day 24 hours

Parking: Street parking is available or you can park at the parking garage at 10 Congress St

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Websites: Belin Mural

Medicine Man Mural

Highlights:murals

Tips:

  • most of the murals are on Wards St and Harbor St
  • some of these murals are in residential areas or painted on apartment complexes

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Sometimes poor judgment can lead to good outcomes.  Such was the case when I decided, against my better judgment, to visit Salem, MA (the Halloween headquarter of America) on a Saturday afternoon in October.  Parking was sparse (all of the main parking lots and parking spaces were taken or full).  But, because I had to park farther away from the downtown area, we spotted another hidden treasure in the city.

These murals were found on Congress St

But, most of the murals are located on Harbor St and Ward St.

These murals were all located along a wall on Harbor St.  Some of them were so well done they actually looked like photographs.

As these murals show, Salem is so much more than scary monsters and witchcraft lore.

So, the next time you’re in Salem, don’t just spend your time looking for ghosts and goblins, make sure to stop by and take a look at these works of art!