Tag Archives: 911

911 Memorial Park (Westfield, MA)

Date Of Visit: September 3, 2018

Location: Union Avenue & North Elm Street

Parking: There are several parking lots (free of charge) in the area and some street parking nearby as well.

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Highlights: 20′ high obelisk memorial to the victims of 9/11 who were natives of Westfield, MA

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They weren’t just bond traders, planning managers and vp’s.  They were sons, daughters, brothers, sisters, aunts and uncles and friends.  They were so much more than just a title or their professional achievements.

The 911 memorial at 911 Memorial Park is a somber reminder of the three people from Westfield, MA, and all of the people who were lost that day.

The park is easy to miss if you’re not looking for it.  The .05 acre park in Westfield, MA, serves to remind Westfield residents and anyone who visits the sacrifice and loss suffered on September 11, 2001. It was dedicated on September 11, 2011, ten years after the attacks.

The memorial is located on an island in the middle of a busy section of the city.  If you do visit, please take notice of this.  There are working traffic lights near the memorial.  Lights are installed in the ground to illuminate the area during the evening, or on overcast days.

The three people who died on that day had so much going for them and had achieved so much in such little time.  But, they were known for more than just their professional achievements.

Tara K Creamer (Shea) had graduated from UMASS Amherst and had a successful career as a planning manager at TJ Maxx.  But, she was more known for her radiant smile.

A bond trader and former draft pick of the Boston Celtics, Daniel Trant was known more for being a family man who loved playing sports with his children.

Brian Joseph Murphy worked as an electronic bond trader.  But, it was being a doting father and husband that he was most proud of.  One of the last things he did with “his girls” was apple picking.

As I took the photos for this memorial, I couldn’t help but think of just how bright blue and clear the skies were.  Much like they were on that day 17 years ago.

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The inscription on the bronze plaque states:

9-11 MEMORIAM
TO INNOCENCE LOST

TARA KATHLEEN CREAMER
FLIGHT 11
NOV. 30, 1970 – SEPT. 11, 2001

BRIAN JOSEPH MURPHY
WORLD TRADE CENTER
MARCH 21, 1960 – SEPT. 11, 2001

DANIEL PATRICK TRANT
WORLD TRADE CENTER
MAY 15, 1961 – SEPT. 11, 2001

I couldn’t find any information concerning the sculptor(s) or what material the memorial is made of.  In a way, this is refreshing.  The emphasis should be on the people and the memories their loved ones have of them.  As it should be on this day.

 


Agawam Fire Department’s September 11 Memorial (Agawam, MA)

Date Visited: September 9, 2016

Location: Agawam Fire Dept Headquarters, 800 Main St, Agawam, MA

Parking:  There is a parking area for 5 or 6 cars next to the memorial area and off street parking available nearby

Hours: Accessible everyday, 24 hours a day

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Dedicated on the first anniversary of the attacks, the Agawam Fire Department’s 9/11 memorial is constructed of two granite blocks.  It is evident that much care and attention to detail was taken in the construction of the memorial.  The towers are spaced accurately with 1 World Trade Center to the left and in front of 2 World Trade Center.  Two benches (one on each side of the towers), more like slabs of concrete, are positioned at the memorial.  it is a place for reflection and peaceful relaxation.  Like all memorials at all of the other fire departments, it is both tasteful and emotional.

A plaque lies at the base of the memorial.

 

Engraved on the plaque is:

TOWN OF AGAWAM

SEPTEMBER 11TH 2001 MEMORIAL

LET IT BE KNOWN TO THE WORLD

UNITED WE STAND

ONE NATION UNDER GOD

FOR LIBERTY AND JUSTICE FOR ALL

GOD BLESS AMERICA

Being from the Boston area and having ties to New York, I know people who were affected on September 11 and I have a personal connection to this day as well.  It is bittersweet to see such beautiful remembrance for such a tragic day.

Normally, I would photograph a memorial closer to my hometown of Boston.  But, since my parents and sister moved to Western Mass it has been like a second home to me.  I’ve spent many holidays, birthdays, vacations and weekends here so it only seems fitting I would spend a special, yet somber, day here to be with my family.

A sign at the flower bed reminds us what is important to remember on this and all days.

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Springfield Museums (Springfield, MA)

Date visited: January 16, 2016

Hours: Tue-Sat 10-5, Sun 11-5, closed Mon

Price:

 

Adults: $18
Seniors: $12
Youth 3–17: $9.50
Children Under 2: Free
Students: $12

Springfield Residents (with valid ID): Free – youth included

There is a parking lot by the science museum entrance with about 50 or so spaces.  There is an overflow parking lot across the street.  Parking is free.

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The museums in Springfield, MA, are not your usual museums.  For one, there are four museums, rather than one.  Secondly, on the grounds of one of the museums is another perhaps bigger attraction, the Dr. Suess National Memorial Garden.

There are four museums are the Springfield Museums.  I spent most of the time at the  Springfield Science Museum

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and the Lyman & Merrie Wood Museum of Springfield History

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The two art and sculpture museums do not allow photography.

The Springfield Science Museum is bigger than it appears on the outside.  It is three floors (a first and second floor with a lower level).  The exhibits range from live animals (mostly fish and other smaller animals such as turtles) to dinosaur bones and artifacts.

There was so much to absorb in those few levels.  But, my two favorite parts of this particular museum had to be the Tyrannosaurus Rex and the demonstration put on by the staff in which the patrons, the children who were visiting, got to find out how fortune teller fish work.

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From the moment you enter the science museum your senses are attracted to all of the interesting items in the main entrance.  The main themes of the museum are the products of the Springfield, MA, area such as Dr. Seuss and Indian Motorcycles which were manufactured in Springfield.

Two former residents of Springfield reside in the museum.

Snowball

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and Jynx

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These animals used to be part of the The Zoo In Forest Park (post about this wonderful park to come in the spring or summer).  When they died, they were stuffed and put on display.

There is a wide variety of fish and other animal life on the lower level.  You have to look closely but the first image is of a shy salmon camouflaged against the rocks.  In fact, many of the animals were shy.

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There were also a variety of toys, art work and fun items for kids of all ages and sizes to enjoy like the skeleton with the Dr. Seuss hat on (note the tie-in to Springfield) and mirrors that make you look smaller and wider, just when I didn’t think I could feel worse about my weight ( :

The second and third levels of the museum have a dinosaur exhibit, planetarium, historical items, models of animals and a variety of other items.

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The historical museum, located across the street from the science museum, is a little smaller but it also has a wide variety of displays.

During my visit, the museum was displaying the Better Angels tribute to the fallen firefighters from September 11, 2001.  The portrait artist who made the display is from nearby East Longmeadow.  The exhibit will be on display until June of this year.

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After seeing this touching tribute, some of the other attractions seem trivial.  There are a variety of old time cars and a fire exhibit in the main area.  There is also an educational play area for children (and adults if you’re inclined).

The Springfield Museums are a great place to visit.  Time seems to go by quickly while you’re there so it’s easy to lose track of time.  But, it is fun for the entire family.