Tag Archives: statue

Christopher Columbus Waterfront Park (Boston, MA)

 

Dates Of Visits: August 19, 2018 and September 4, 2018

Location: 105 Atlantic Ave, Boston, MA

Cost: Free

Hours: Open daily sunrise to sunset

Size/Trail Difficulty: 4.5 acres/easy

Parking: There is street parking and several parking garages in the area

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Website: Christopher Columbus Waterfront Park

Highlights: statue of Christopher Columbus, memorial, scenic, fountain, trellis, family friendly

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Although he is not from the area, Christopher Columbus can be considered an adopted son of the North End, a once, and still somewhat, largely Italian neighborhood (although Columbus may have been more likely Spanish they will still claim him).

Dedicated in 1974, Christopher Columbus Park is a family friendly park with open spaces for tanning, reading or just sitting and enjoying a very summer-like day as was the case during my two visits. There are also wonderful views at the park.

The park offers beautiful views of the harbor.  Harbor boats can be seen coming and going on their scheduled trips.

The views from the waterfront are very pretty.

A statue of the explorer who the park was named after is located along the trellis.

The 6x3x2 (12 feet tall in total if you include the base) monument is made out of white Carrara marble, the same marble that is mined in Carrara, Italy.  It is the very same marble from which Michelangelo sculpted the statues “Pieta,” “Moses,” and “David.” There appears to be ropes and a piling with a float on it by his legs.  He is clutching a book or manuscript and a dagger is attached to his belt. The statue was designed by Andrew J. Mazzola and it was fabricated by Norwood Monumental Works in 1979.

A fountain dedicated to Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy and next to the Rose Kennedy Garden, is a peaceful place to sit and watch the water.

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Or, you can use it to cool down like Teagan a 6 month old Golden Retriever.

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Lilly, an 8 year old Golden Retriever, didn’t like the fountain as much as Teagan but she still liked the park. I love how  Golden retrievers always seem to look like they are smiling.  Probably because they are.

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The Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Garden, dedicated to the matriarch of the Kennedy family, has a wide variety of flowers.

But, the pretty flowers are not only located in the garden.  There are beautiful flowers throughout the park.

The other main attraction, beside the statue of Columbus, is the trellis.  Ivy and white lights are attached to the trellis.  During the holiday season, blue lights are attached to it.

During my visit, there was a scavenger hunt by the Dragon Of Bostonshire.  This lady was giving a speech with hints for all of the participants.

There’s lots of entertainment at the park.  This musician played a heartbreaking instrumental of Vincent by Don McLean.

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Another more famous musician was playing at the park during my visit.  I could write a blog post just about him.  The most interesting thing about Keytar is his identity.  Or the mystery behind his identity. Keytar Bear is a local celebrity.  But, little else is known about him.  Keytar plays at a variety of different locations in the Boston area, unannounced.  You could see him at a train station (I’ve seen him at South Station) or any other venue in the Boston area, particularly during the warmer seasons.  In fact, it’s so normal to see him people really aren’t fazed by his presence.  No one knows what he (I am pretty sure I read the musician is a male in an article) looks like or his name.  But, everyone knows him when they see him.

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If music isn’t your thing, there are other ways to entertain yourself like a game of hop scotch.

Or, you could climb a tree.

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There is also a memorial dedicated to the 9 marines from Massachusetts who were killed in the Beirut bombing (220 U.S. Marines, 241 US Service personnel and 305 people in total were killed that day by the bombers).  It’s easy to miss if you don’t know it is there.  It is next to the children’s playground and close to the Average Joe’s restaurant.  The memorial is easy to miss if you don’t know it’s there.  In fact, I made a second trip to find it after I missed it the first time.

It always strikes me when I read the names and ages of just how young these soldiers are when they die.  They had so much more to live for.

The nine Marines from Massachusetts names are inscribed on the memorial.  They are:

  • LCP Bradley J. Campus – Lynn, 1962-1983
  • LCP Michael J. Delvin – Westwood, 1962-1983
  • SGT MAJ Frederick B. Douglass – Cataumet, 1936-1983
  • CPT Sean R. Gallagher – North Andover, 1952-1983
  • SGT Edward J. Gargano – Quincy, 1962-1983
  • CPT Richard J. Gordon – Somerville, 1961-1983
  • CPT Michael S. Haskell – Westborough, 1950-1983
  • SGT Steven B. LaRiviere – Chicopee, 1961-1983
  • LCP Thomas S. Perron – Whitinsville, 1964-1983

Below is a video of Keytar Bear playing his keytar with a background track.  His music is very chill.


Grieving Gold Star Mother Statue (Manchester, NH)

 

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Date Visited: August 7, 2016

Location: Charles R. Stanton Plaza, in front of the JD’s Tavern and Radisson hotel, 700 Elm St # 1, Manchester, NH

Hours:  Open daily, 24 hours a day

Cost: Free

Parking: You can usually find metered off street parking

Dog Friendly: Yes

I found this statue to be timely considering some of the discourse these days. The Grieving Gold Star Mother statue located, appropriately, across the street from the Veterans Memorial Park at Charles R. Stanton Plaza in front of the Radisson and JD’s Tavern at 700 Elm St, Manchester, NH, is a tribute to all mothers and families who have lost a loved one at war.

The Grieving Gold Star Mother shows the teary eyed mom clutching a telegram, presumably with the notice of her son’s death. A potted planted lies knocked over in front of a photo of her son.

The 407 pound bronze statue, sculpted by Andrew Chernak, was said to depict a mother from World War II because that is the war that had the most fatalities. However, the Gold Star Mothers group was formed by Grace Darling Seibold during World War I when her son, George Vaughn Seibold, was lost (his body was never identified). In an effort to console herself and other mothers who had lost a child during the war, Grace created the group. The group not only consoled each grieving mother. They also dedicated themselves to doing community service and visiting wounded service members.

There are two Grieving Gold Star Mother statues in the U.S. The first Grieving Gold Star Mother statue is located in Carmel, New York. There is also a Gold Star Mother and a Gold Star Father memorial with statues of each Gold Star parent in Clinton, Ohio.

Bricks with the names of all of the wars the United States have been involved in (Colonial and post Colonial times) have been placed in front of the statue. The list of conflicts and wars and the loss of lives involved in those actions are staggering.

The memorial in New Hampshire was erected in April 15, 2011.

 


Burnside Fountain (Worcester, MA)

Date Visited: March 19, 2016

Location: next to Worcester Common, 455 Main St.

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Just outside of Worcester Common, at 455 Main St, sits an unusual monument.  Also known as “Turtle Boy”, the Burnside Fountain looks like a cross between a Roman sculpture and a high school prank gone wrong.  But, this statue is no prank.  It is a very real monument.  In fact, it is a gift from Harriet Burnside,  a philanthropist and the daughter of a prominent lawyer in Worcester; Samuel Burnside.  In her will, Harriet donated $5,000 to the city to build a fountain in memory of her father.  Harriet Burnside specifically requested the fountain be used as a drinking trough for horses and dogs.

Enter Charles Y. Harvey. Harvey was given the task of designing the fountain.  For some reason that is still unknown, he chose a design called “boy with turtle”.  Henry Bacon, who also worked on the Lincoln Memorial, designed the basin.

In an interesting turn of events, Harvey would take his own life, claiming before doing so that the half finished sculpture was telling him to do so.  Sherry Frye finished the sculpture.  The statue was completed in 1912.

The bronze statue sits on a pink rectangular basin.   The basin has four bowls, two on each side of the statue.

Despite the various interpretations, the statue is not meant to be as controversial.  It was just meant to be a statue about a boy and his turtle.  It was a simpler time.

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Bronstein Park (Manchester, NH)

Date Visited: February 27, 2016

Location: Beech St, Manchester, New Hampshire (with access points on Union, St, Amherst St and Hanover St)

Cost: Free to the public

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Although a statue that is dedicated to the veterans of the Spanish American War, the Boxer Rebellion and the Phillipine-American War, Bronstein Park celebrates a hero from another war.

Although “The Hiker” stands prominently at the street entrance to the park, Bronstein Park (formerly known as Hanover Square) is actually named after a corpsman who died in World War II; Dr. Ben Richard Bronstein, the first Manchester, New Hampshire, resident to die during the war.  Dr Bronstein’s brother, Maurice Bronstein, donated the memorial to the park in 1990.

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The inscription on the memorial is hard to read in some parts.  It states:

“in memory of
Dr. BEN RICHARD BRONSTEIN,
LIEUTENANT, MEDICAL CORPS,
aboard the destroyer
U.S.S. Jacob Jones
Lost in Action, February 28, 1942
First Naval Officer
From the State of New Hampshire
To have Sacrificed his life
in the fulfillment of his duty
in World War II.

Another memorial pays tribute to Dr. Bronstein’s brother, Stephen Max Bronstein, who also served during the war.

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“The Hiker” was originally sculpted by Theo Alice Ruggles Kitson in 1906.  The original statue was made for the University of Minnesota.  However, 50 copies were made of her statue and were distributed all over America.  Manchester, New Hampshire was the recipient of one of the copies of her statue.  The statue is made of bronze on a base of granite, of course.

The name “hiker” was a moniker the American soldiers in the Spanish American War and Philippine-American War gave themselves because of the long hikes they took in the jungle.  Kitson said the hiker, “depicts a hero stripped of his parade uniform and shown as a soldier reacting to the challenges of the battlefield.”

Leonard Sefing, Jr., a Spanish-American War veteran, was the model for the statue.

A close inspection of the statue shows a weary soldier clad in civilian type apparel.

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An American flag stands in front of the memorial for Dr. Ben Bronstein.

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One strange thing I noticed is a warning posted that prohibits people from hanging out at the park during school hours.  So that is something to bear in mind if you do visit.  I’m not sure why this restriction is in place.  I can only imagine you would be the talk of the town in prison if you ever got convicted of it “Don’t mess with that guy.  He’s in here for loitering.” (I know it’s probably just a fine)

Below are some additional photos of the park from different angles.

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Stark Park (Manchester, NH)

Date Visited: February 27, 2016

Location: North River Rd, Manchester, NH

Cost: Free

Hours: Open daily sunrise to sunset

Parking:  There was not a designated parking area per se but there are many places to park on the side of the paved road leading from the entrance.

Stark Park

 

 

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New Hampshire isn’t known as the “Live Free Or Die” state for no reason.  The quote, which is said to have French origins and adorns license plates and other kitschy souvenirs, is directly attributed to General, and former New Hampshire resident, John Stark.  It was at John Stark Park in Manchester, NH, that I found this historical tribute to the revolutionary warrior.

The remaining of the “live free or die…”quote is lesser known, yet just as poignant.

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For someone who is so heroic and brave, General Stark is not someone who many of us are familiar with.  But, heroic he is.  As the plaque in front of his statue explains, after being kidnapped by a Native American tribe and eventually ransomed, Stark joined the American Revolution and became a general.  His most notable achievement was in 1777 when he commanded his troops to prevent British troops and supplies from connecting with the main army in Saratoga, New York, which was considered a key point which led to the American victory in the war.

Crisp blue skies awaited me at the park.  It almost felt fall-like.  What struck me most about the park was how peaceful it was.  The gazebo is a nice touch also.  The statue of General Stark was sculpted by Richard Recchia in 1948.  The park is one of the older parks in New Hampshire, dating back to 1893 (it is the second oldest park in Manchester).

 

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General Stark his, wife and a few of their children are buried at the bottom of the hill from the entrance.

One of the interesting things about Stark Park is the loop behind the park.  It’s only about a quarter of mile and it is a great place to take your dog for a walk.  But, there is a trail that branches off to a bridge and some other trails which eventually lead to the Heritage Trail.  But, apart from some interesting trees and some wildlife, there isn’t much on the trails.  Most of them lead to residential areas.  I walked most of the narrow trails as far as I could go before they ended, rather disappointingly, at roadways and residential areas.

The big payoff to walking the loop behind the park was meeting Bennie.  Bennie is a Chinook which is the state dog of New Hampshire.

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Plymouth Rock (Plymouth, MA)

 

Who would ever think people would travel from all over the country and all over the world just to see a rock?  Yes, a  rock.  This is not just any rock, though.

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The rumored landing spot of the Mayflower, Plymouth Rock is one of the more disappointing yet often visited sites south of Boston, MA.

Despite it’s popularity, the rock at Plymouth Rock is not the actual rock the Mayflower struck.  In fact, the rock has been said to have been moved at least three different times and the rock has been said to have been damaged several times, breaking in half at one point.  Not only that, but the passengers of the Mayflower initially landed in Provincetown in Cape Cod.

While the rock itself probably isn’t the actual rock the Mayflower struck upon its landing and it’s not the actual initial landing spot of the Pilgrims, it is symbolic of the voyage the persistence of the people who landed there.

Located in walking distance of the Mayflower II, the rock is located at the bottom of a pit and protected by a fence.

The rock is located in a structure with pillar columns.

The harbor is usually teaming with activity.

There is also a monument located across the street from Plymouth Rock.  The Pilgrim Mother was donated in 1921 to celebrate the Tercentenary of the Mayflower landing by the Daughters of the American Revolution.

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I met Bo while I was visiting the memorial.

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and these two cuties