Tag Archives: cape cod

Yarmouth Sand Sculpture Trail 2020

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Date Of Visit: June 26, 2020

Location: Yarmouth, MA

Cost: Free

Parking: Free parking is available at or near each of the locations of the sand sculptures

Universally Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Summary: 17 sand sculptures are located throughout the Yarmouth, MA, area.  The sculptures are located conveniently at places of business and other popular landmarks like Yarmouth Town Hall and the visitor center in Yarmouth.While it is possible to walk to some of the sand sculptures, the only way to see all of the sand sculptures in a timely fashion is to travel by vehicle.  The sculptures will be around until Columbus weekend (Oct, 12)

Website: Yarmouth Sand Sculpture Trail 2020

Map: Yarmouth Sand Sculpture Trail 2020 Map

Sculptor: Tracy Fitzpatrick at Fitzysnowman Studios.

Yarmouth, MA, has some unusual tourists this summer.

The sculptor Tracy Fitzpatrick at Fitzysnowman Studios has created 17 sand sculptures located throughout Yarmouth once again for everyone to find and enjoy.  The 20 year tradition is a socially distancing friendly activity that is fun for the entire family.

Don’t worry if we get some rain or stormy weather.  Barring any vandalism, the sand sculptures will still be there throughout the summer.  But, vandalism can be an issue.  In fact, last year, when we went to visit them, three of the sculptures had been damaged.  So, I didn’t even bother posting the photos.  However, all of the sand sculptures were intact during my visit this weekend.

The reason why these sculptures don’t break down so easily is because they are built with finely ground quarried sand, which has sharp edges and stacks like sugar cubes.  This sand tends to keep its integrity unlike beach sand because beach sand doesn’t stick together as well because it is often rounded by wave-action and includes bits of oddly shaped seashells.  The sand sculptures that were built last year were built so sturdy they withstood 110 mile per hour winds during two tornados in the area.

Each sand sculpture is created one at a time, typically in a single day. Work usually begins in late May and continues throughout the month of June.  The sculptures were expected to be completed by June 26, the very same day I went to view them.  They are planned on being up until Columbus weekend (October 12).

The numbers of the locations of the sand sculptures are listed alphabetically on the map.  However, it would not make sense to look for them in the order they are listed on the map.  I am listing the locations based on the way I found them during my trip. Of course, you can travel to each sculpture in any order you choose.  But, I decided to go to the Taylor Bray Farm in Yarmouth Port first because it is the location that is the farthest away from the other sand sculptures.  Then, I tried to do a loop to visit the rest of the sand sculptures until I checked them all of my list.

I have included the addresses and landmarks where each sand sculpture can be found.  However, I could not find the exact addresses of some of them.  So, it’s tricky getting to some of them.  But, finding them is part of the fun!

I am listing the locations in the order I found them, mostly.  I am also including the number that corresponds to the sculpture number on the map in parenthesis.  But, I must admit some of the sculptures don’t seem to follow in order on the map and I actually stumbled across some of them by mistake (although that may have more to do with a lack of map reading skills on my part).  Unfortunately, due to how the sculptures are scattered throughout the area, you may have to backtrack to see them all in an orderly and efficient way.  Lastly, don’t forget to enter the Yarmouth sand sculpture photo contest!

(14)  Taylor Bray Farm

108 Bray Farm Rd N, Yarmouth, MA

(13) Strawberry Lane (Route 6A) Yarmouth Port, MA

(9) Kinlin Grover Real Estate

927 Route 6A, Yarmouth Port, MA

(8) Just Picked Gifts

13 Willow St, Yarmouth Port, MA

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4) The Cove At Yarmouth

183 Main St, West Yarmouth, MA

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(10) Route 28 Visitor Center

424 Route 28, West Yarmouth, MA

(1) Aiden By Best Western at Cape Point

476 Route 28, West Yarmouth, MA

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(11) Salty’s

540 Main Street, Rt. 28, West Yarmouth, MA

(3) Candy Co (my favorite store on the trail!)

975 Route 28, South Yarmouth, MA

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(7) John G Sears & Co Inc (no, this isn’t a selfie)

1221 Old Main St, South Yarmouth, MA

Dogs like the sculptures too

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(12) Seafood Sam’s

1006 Massachusetts (Route) 28 South Yarmouth, MA

(17) Yarmouth (MA) Town Hall

1146 Route 28, South Yarmouth, MA

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6) Hearth ‘n Kettle (the fish are also wearing PPE but they’re not distancing!)

1196 Main Street, South Yarmouth, MA

(2) Bass River Golf Course

62 High Bank Rd, South Yarmouth, MA

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(5) Dunkin’ Donuts

436 Station Ave, South Yarmouth, MA

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Today Real Estate

487 Station Ave, South Yarmouth, MA

(16) Wendy’s

32 Old Town House Rd, South YarmouthMA

“The Fisherman” (Cape Cod Canal, Buzzards Bay, Cape Cod, MA)

Date Of Visit: January 1, 2020

Location: Cape Cod Canal, 70 Main St, Buzzards Bay, Bourne, MA

Hours: The statue is accessible everyday,  24 hours a day, although the hours the canal is accessible may be different

Cost: Free

Parking: there is a parking lot for about 100 or more cars at the base of the trail of the canal.  There are also various parking areas along the canal.

Summary: Dedicated on the 100th anniversary of the birth of the Cape Cod Canal, “The Fisherman” sculpture of Stan Gibbs stands next to the main parking lot to the entrance of the Cape Cod Canal trail.

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Buzzards Bay has long been known for the fishing enthusiasts who travel far and wide to try their luck in the waters of the Cape Cod Canal.  Now, there is a statue dedicated to the people who fish in these waters.  But, the 10 foot tall bronze statue sculpted by Cape Cod native and resident David Lewis is actually dedicated to one particular fisherman.

Legendary hunter, trapper, fisherman and lure-making expert Stan Gibbs, a frequent visitor to the Canal, is the impetus for this statue.  In fact, the people who decided to build this statue were member of the Stan Gibbs Fisherman’s Classic Tournament, an annual fishing contest held each September named in his honor.

Originally from Easton, Gibbs moved to Sagamore, a town in Bourne, MA, and just short distance from the canal.  It was there that Gibbs developed his love and skill of angling.  He would use his skill and knowledge of fishing to create lures, called Gibbs Lures, later in his life.

Dedicated in 2016, as part of the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Canal, the statue shows Gibbs with two fish slung over his right shoulder and a fishing rod in his left.  A tablet rests on the block the statue stands on.  Engraved in it is the following:

THE FISHERMAN

A tribute to past present and future striped bass fisherman and the great cape cod canal.  Dedicated to local fishing legend Stan Gibbs 

 

Perhaps most importantly to the residents of the area, the statue didn’t cost the tax payers one dime.  The $80,000 price tag for the statue and surrounding area was funded through 7 years of fund raising.

The next time you stop by the canal, make sure to say “hi” to Stan!

As an addendum to my post, I apologize for my absence from WordPress.  I have been moving and anyone who has done this knows the time and effort involved in this process.  Things have settled down now and I will post more frequently.  I hope you all continue to view my content.  Since it is easier and less time consuming, I have been posting on my Facebook page regularly.  The link to my Facebook page is listed below.  Please connect with me on Facebook to see more content in a more timely fashion.  Thank you!

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Waterfront Park (Woods Hole, MA)

The last leg of our summer’s swan song at Cape Cod was spent at Waterfront Park in Woods Hole.  Waterfront Park has several statues and sculptures.  The most recent statue is a memorial to environmentalist Rachel Carson, the author of Silent Spring and the Sea Around Us.  Both books are considered influential books in the environmentalist movement.  Carson had worked with Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) which is located in Woods Hole.

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The waterfront also has a shaded sitting area for the weary traveler to rest their bones.

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There is also a sun dial statue dedicated to Robert Crane, one of the original financial supporters of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.  The sun dial was constructed so that you could tell what time it is from any direction.  And, yes, it is accurate. A somewhat elaborate explanation is included on the ground in front of the sun dial.

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The “Flukes” is a bronze sculpture by Gordon Gund.  Gund, a successful businessman, was inspired to sculpt The Flukes after seeing pilot whales off the coast.  It looks like more of a slide or play thing which explains the sign in front of the sculpture.  I suspect it is not much of a deterrent.

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The Waterfront is also the main point of embarkment for the ferry to the islands of Cape Cod, mainly Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard.

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The waterfront also has some pretty views of the water and pretty flowers.

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The waterfront park is also known for its friendly visitors.  I met this friendly guy named Charlie as I was leaving.

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Goodbye summer!  See you again in 2016.


Nobska Lighthouse (Woods Hole, MA)

Located across from Nobska Beach, the Nobska Lighthouse is a popular stop for tourists.

DSC_0807 DSC_0812  The present tower was built in 1876.  It stands 40 feet and has a focal plane view of 87 feet.

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The keeper’s house next to the light house serves as the home for the commander of Coast Guard Sector Southeastern New England.

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A busy paved roadway separates the two places.  You will often cyclists and even runners on the road.  So, it can be a tricky road to navigate.  But, across the road are some good views of the water.  The islands (Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard) can be seen in the distance.

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There are also some pretty views of the grounds of the light house and the beach

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The Nobska lighthouse was  a nice break from the crowded beach, although the lighthouse also gets its fair share of visitors.  But, before long, it was time for the next and final leg of our Farewell to Summer Cape Cod trip…


Nobska Beach (Woods Hole, MA)

After a short stay at Scraggy Neck, it was time for our next stop on our Cape Cod Farewell Summer trip.

Our next destination was the Nobska Beach in the quaint village of Woods Hole in Falmouth, Massachusetts.  The Nobska area is so pretty and there are so many attractions because of its sheer beauty, I decided cover the Nobska area in two separate blogs.

The first thing that stands out at Nobska beach are the array of flowers and the makeshift trails at the beach (that and the lack of parking).  The only parking available is on the side of the road along the beach and a scant few spots in front of the light house (I’ll be posting photos of the light house in the second part of the Nobska photo blogs).

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Nobska Beach offers views of both Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket Island.

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Boats and the ferry make frequent trips to the islands

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If you hadn’t noticed, one of the treasures of Nobska Beach are the rocks and the rock formations.       DSC_0561 DSC_0573     DSC_0658

But, to capture the real beauty of the views from the beach, it was necessary to walk down a narrow trail down to this modest rocky ledge.

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But, the ledge was wide enough for me and my camera.  And the views were well worth the extra effort.

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Nobska Beach is also home to a variety of wildlife.

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At the base of the beach there are two memorials. A memorial for Dennis Jeff Sabo lies under some plants, almost unnoticed.  The memorial does not give any more information than his date of birth, date of death and name.  A Google search yielded no results.  The lack of details about Dennis adds to the memorials’ mystique.

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The other memorial is dedicated to Neilie Anne Heffernan Casey.  Neilie was a passenger on Flight 11 on September 11, 2001. A memorial and bench bearing her name lay in the area now dubbed “Neilie Point”.  A beautiful reminder of an awful day.

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Scraggy Neck (Cataumet, MA)

After a brief but rewarding stay at Amrita Island, it was on the next destination on my Farewell Summer Cape Cod trip.  Scraggy Neck is a private beach in Cataumet, a village in Bourne, Massachusetts.

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The beach is usually monitored by guards during the summer season.  But, since summer was basically over, there were no guards when I arrived at the beach.

The entrance to the beach is grassy.  But, there is a makeshift trail you can follow.  The occasional flower stand in the grass

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The beach is long and it was high tide when I visited.  But, there wasn’t much of a beach head when I was visited.  The water did look clean and clear.

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Seaweed and shells littered the beach.

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Scraggy Neck is divided into two sides by a road that is frequented by joggers, bikers and cars.  It was on the other side of the road that showed off Scraggy Neck’s more scenic views.

A narrow path leads to the water.

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The fish is visible through the transparent water.

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This part of Scraggy Neck is mostly grassy.  So, it would not be the ideal area to lie out for a tan.

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Scraggy Neck is also a popular spot for boaters to launch from.

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After visiting Scraggy Neck, it was on to our next adventure….


Amrita Island (Bourne, MA)

After spending the morning at the Cape Cod Canal, it was time for the next stop on my day trip.  The next leg of my Cape weekend tour was spent at the hidden jewel of Bourne; Amrita Island. 

To view the blog about the first leg of my Cape Cod trip check out my blog about the Cape Cod Canal.

An island in the town of Bourne, Amrita Island is one of the lesser known islands of Cape Cod.  The reason many people may not know about this island is because it looks like any other side street in the area.  The only indication there may be an island there is an inconspicuous sign you could easily miss unless you were looking for it.

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Amrita Island is connected to Cataumet (the village within Bourne where Amrita Island is located) by an ornate, albeit short, stone bridge.

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There are spectacular views from the bridge.

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But, to get the best views, you have to get off the bridge and walk around the surrounding area

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There is also an abundance of plant life and pretty trees.

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There is also a variety of wildlife on Amrita Island.  Fish, ducks and birds are abundant onthe island. The fish were swarming in a circle for some reason.

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I also met Hadley, a resident of the island.

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I will be posting the next installment of my Cape Cod trip later this weekend.  Stay tuned!

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Cape Cod Canal (Buzzards Bay, MA)

One last summer weekend.  One last chance to soak up the dwindling magic of summer.  What better way to laze away the remaining summer bliss than at the iconic Cape Cod Canal?

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The canal stretches for 7 miles for Sandwich, MA, to Buzzards Bay.  There are several entrances to the canal.  We chose the entrance near the end of the canal at Buzzards Bay.

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The views at the canal are one of the main attractions.

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Fishermen and fisher women dot the rocky edges of the canal and it is a popular starting point for bikers, runners and walkers.  The canal also is a bustling point for ships carrying a variety of cargo, particularly since it is so close to the Massachusetts Maritime Academy.  I caught one as it passed under the railroad bridge.

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Ducks and seagulls also find the canal too be a fun place to enjoy the summer.

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This lady thought I was spying on her.

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Well, until next summer…I’ll meet you at the canal.

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