Tag Archives: mill

Stanley Park 2017 (Westfield, MA)

Dates Of Visits: May 31 & June 2, 2017

Location: 400 Western Ave, Westfield, MA

Hours:

Official Season: Open to the public (7 days a week) from 7:00 am until dusk daily(1/2 hour before sunset) from the first Saturday in May to the last Sunday in November.

Off-Season: Gate 1, across from Westfield State University’s Woodward Center, is open year-round from 7:00 am until dusk daily, weather permitting. Upon entrance, please note gate closing times.

Cost: Free

Parking: During the “official season” from around early May until the end of November, there are two parking areas with ample parking (probably room for 300 or more cars) .  During the off season, the second parking lot is closed.

Size/Trail Difficulty: 300 acres, easy trails

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly:Yes

Highlights: sports fields, play area, pond, trails, flower garden, fountain, sculptures, covered bridge, birds, wildlife, ample parking

Website: Stanley Park

Map: Stanley Park Map

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If you read the title of this blog post and thought thought to yourself, “Hey you’ve already posted about this place” you would be correct.  I visited Stanley Park in June, 2015 but I was told, incorrectly, by a park worker that I was not allowed to take photos there with paying a fee first.  So, I was only able to use a few photos from my original visit and I had tp use my camera phone for the remainder of the photos and they did not come out very good.  So, I decided to take another trip to the park last week.  If you do want to see my original post you can access it here:  Stanley Park in 2015.

Named after Frank Stanley Beveridge, Stanley Park, Stanley Park is one of the most popular parks in Western MA.  Throughout the year they hold various memorial services  for veterans, musical shows and even a road race among other events.  But, Stanley Park is also a great to play to visit to get away from people and just have a peaceful hike along the many trails there or to just sit and watch the various wildlife that inhabit the park.

Originally from Pembroke Shores, Nova Scotia, Frank Stanley Beveridge would go on to create the company Stanley Home Products after immigrating to the states and eventually settling in Westfield, MA.  Because of his love if nature and its inhabitants, he would establish Stanley Park of Westfield, Inc. on twenty-five acres of land in Westfield, Massachusetts.  Since then it has grown exponentially but it has still kept the same natural beauty.

The first thing that stood out to me while visiting Stanley Park are the colors, particularly during the spring summer and especially during the fall foliage season.  Whether it is the variety of birds at the park, the colorful flowers and green grass or the Koi fish in the pond, the colors were really popping at Stanley.

One of the things Stanley Park is most known for is its population of black squirrels.  Since they are not indigenous to the area, their origins have often been a matter of curious debate.  No, they weren’t dropped off by aliens nor did they travel to the park as part of a family vacation.

The black squirrels are actually from Michigan.  They were gifts from former Stanley Home Products sales managers, Hubert L. Worell and Alvah (Al) Elzerman.  They were brought there in 1948 and their population has steadily increased.  As you can see, they are very well fed.

There is a soccer/lacrosse field, basketball court and play area for children in the main parking area.  You can also access the Beveridge Nature Sanctuary Trail from the parking area.  The Sanctuary Trail is 229 acres of easy trails with some gentle inclines.

Stanley Park is home to a variety of blue jays, cardinals, ducks, geese and other birds s well as frogs and turtles.

One of the best places at Stanley Park is the area behind the pond at the entrance.  Chipmunks, squirrels, birds and other critters stop by in the hopes of some nuts or other treats from passing visitors.  In fact, when I walked over to the area chipmunks actually came out from hiding to greet me, in the hopes I might have some snacks for them.  They weren’t disappointed.

You can even hand feed them.

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Stanley Park also has a garden area with roses, rhododendrons, azaleas and other flowers and pretty trees.

There is also a covered bridge at Stanley Park.  Even though it only allows foot traffic the Goodrich Bridge is still bridge and it is indeed covered.  It is one of the 13 wooden covered bridges in Massachusetts.  I never really considered it an actual covered bridge since it is not on a roadway or sidewalk.  But, it does meet the criteria.

An old blacksmith building is located near the bridge.

There is a mill by the pond and a couple of waterfalls.

 

There are also several memorials and monuments at Stanley Park.

This Veteran’s Memorial is dedicated to all of those in Westfield who have served.  Black plaques on the ground list the names of the people from Westfield who have died while serving.

This memorial, Our Lady Of Fatima, was dedicated in September 1952 to Otto Bono Calegari, a Westfield native who was killed during the Korean Conflict.  The memorial was handcrafted by Otto’s father, Rocco Calegari.

The Carillon Tower is located near the gardens.  Completed in 1950, the tower tower was dedicated to world peace.  From time to time, the bells of the Carillon are rung at the tower as part of their Carillon Tower ceremonies.  The bronze doors are decorated with 14 relief sculptures portraying various aspects of the Park and Stanley Home Products, as well as profiles of Frank Stanley Beveridge and Catherine L. O’Brien.

The map in front of the tower measures 23 feet by 30 feet, and is composed of multicolored New York slate.

The Angel of Independence was a gift from Stanley Home Products sales persons from Mexico on October 25, 1958. The monument is a Replica of the statue Placido de lareforma in Mexico City which stands for Liberty and Freedom. The base is Vermont Marble and stands 30 feet tall.

I couldn’t find much information about this statue except that it is referred to as the “Children With Umbrella” statue.  It is a fairly new addition as far as I can tell.

There are also dinosaur tracks at Stanley Park.  Tracks that are said to be over 100 million years old.  The tracks are actually from the Carlton Nash Quarry South Hadley (MA).

There are two fountains at Stanley.  They are both located in the garden area and near the entrance by Gate 2.

I saw someone riding this cute bicycle at Stanley and she was kind enough too let me photograph it.  I especially liked the bell she would ring from time to time as she rode it.

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There is so much beauty at Stanley Park.  Just the way the trees bend and the views from the upper level where the garden is located to the duck ponds and the bridges that are scattered throughout the park are sights to behold.

Stanley Park is a great place to bring your dog, although he or she may want to chase or make friends with the ducks and geese there.

I met Duke, a 1 year old rescue, while I was walking along the Sanctuary Trail.  He was such a friendly guy!

.Biscuit, or Bubba, a 5 year old Bulldog and Mastiff was enjoying a walk along the boardwalk .  Her fur was so soft!

As the clouds came rolling in, it was evident it was time to leave.

This is video of the hail storm that followed shortly after we left.

To view videos like the one above and other content I do not share on this blog, please connect with me on Facebook.  I hope to see you there!

 


Montague Bookmill (Montague, MA)

Date Visited: March 28, 2016

Location: 440 Greenfield Rd, Montague, MA

Hours: Mon-Wed 10 a.m. -6 p.m., Thu-Sun 10 a.m. 8:00 p.m.

Parking:  there is lots of parking on the side and back of the book store.  There is also a lot across the street from the bookstore.

Montague Book Mill

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Do you like books?  How about mills?  Then I have just the place for you.  But, this is no ordinary book store.  A former gristmill now operating as a used book store, the Bookmill has gone through many changes throughout its history.  But, it still keeps true to its beginnings.  The structure is largely the very same one that operated as a mill so long ago and the brook that runs along the two floor book shop is the very same one they used to power the gristmill so long ago.

Upon arriving at the Bookmill, the first thing you notice is the brook fed by a waterfall adjacent to the shop.

A short easy to walk path takes you to the source of the stream of water.

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The short waterfall and stream can be pretty fast in some spots.  But, when I came to visit it slowed down after it plummeted down the waterfall.

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After the short walk back up the trail, you can access the bookstore by a wooden walkway with some more views of the waterfall and stream.

Or, you can just walk straight across (the easier route, less scenic route).

The great thing about the Bookmill is that it has kept much of the original charm and design of the past.  Narrow stairwells and cozy corners are the hallmark of the shop.  Memorabilia, such as old style typewriters, are scattered throughout the store.  The staff doesn’t rush you nor do you feel a sense that profit is their main driver.  Service and a respect for books seems to be the most important thing t the staff.  It’s a great place for any book lover and anyone who loves to lounge around historic places.

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They even have newspaper clippings and memorabilia along the walls in the more private areas.

The Bookmill is not the only shop in the area.  In the shopping area there is also a cafe, The Lady Killigrew Cafe, located next to the book store and The Alvah Stone, a restaurant. There are also two art studios and an entertainment/media store called Turn It Up.  Turn It Up specializes in selling cd’s, dvd’s, vinyl and even cassette tapes.  They also sell other memorabilia.  It’s a unique store in a very unique shopping area.

The owner of Turn It Up let me photograph his 10 year old  dog and part owner, Daisy.

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Below is a video of the waterfall and stream next to the Bookmill.

Please stop by and connect with me on my Facebook page: New England Nomad

 


Wayside Inn Colonial Faire (Sudbury, MA)

When one reminisces of a simpler time they rarely think of muskets,militias and mills.  But, that is what they have at the Wayside Inn Colonial Faire.

You don’t have to be a history nerd, I mean buff, to enjoy the faire.  But, it helps.  The main attraction, all year round has to be the Grist Mill.

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The inside of the mill is just as cool as the outside.  Inside the mill,  a reenactor shows how bread was made.

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One of my favorite attractions is the schoolhouse.  Ironic, because in the past I would avoid schools like they were the plague.

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The teacher told an interesting story about how Mary Sawyer was the inspiration behind “Mary had a little lamb”.  A stone outside the building bears the rhyme.

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Another big attraction at the Wayside Inn is the Mary Martha Chapel with its gilded banner weather vane.

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Every year, hundreds of reenactors come dressed in their best colonial era attire.

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Despite being armed to the teeth, the only surprise attacks were the occasional Colonial era photo bombs.  DSC_0029

The highlight for the reenactors came when they all lined up on the main road and marched in their groups.

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On the fairgrounds, there were tables where you can buy kettle corn, furs of unknown origin and other merchandise.  There were also colonial soldiers, tents, tepees and entertainment.

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The tepee was about as cozy as your average 2 bedroom apartment in the city.

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Even when the faire is not taking place, the grounds of the Wayside Inn are worthy of a photography shoot.

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The Wayside Inn is a rustic building that hasn’t changed much.

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The wayside Inn also has an impressive garden.  In the garden there is a bust of Longfellow.

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And, of course, there were plenty of canine friends at the faire.

Rico was very curious about my camera.

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Pablo took a little rest on his walk.

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Fritz enjoyed a treat while he was photographed.

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Buster was all smiles at the faire.

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