Tag Archives: deer

World’s End (Hingham, MA)

Date Visited: August 28, 2016

Location: 250 Martin’s Lane, Hingham, MA

Hours: open everyday, 8:00 a.m. until sunset

Cost: $6 for adults, annual memberships which include free admission are available for $47

Size: 4.5  miles of continuous trails, 251 acres

Parking: there are three parking areas with roughly 20 spots each.  When I left at 1:00 p.m. the lot was full and there was a line of about half a dozen cars waiting to get into the park.

Time To Allot For Visit: 2 hours

Dog Friendly: Yes

Trail Difficulty: Easy to Moderate

Highlights: scenic views of the Boston skyline and surrounding area, wildlife, occasionally they display exhibits at the park, benches to sit along the trail, pretty trees and flowers, perfect for walkers, joggers, runners, cyclists and even horseback riders and anowshoeing during the winter

Lowlights: limited parking (if you follow the reservation Twitter they post alerts when the lot is full)

Website: World’s End

World’s End Trail Map

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I “misunderestimated” World’s End.  I figured it would be an “easy” quick jaunt (I usually save my easier treks for Sundays).  So, I slipped on my Chuck Taylor All-Stars and figured I would be home in a few hours.  Not the best choice of footwear in retrospect.  The trails can be rocky (particularly if you go off trail) and deceivingly steep in some areas.

There are a lot of side trails and it’s easy to get confused and cover the same area twice (or more) which can add quite a bit of time to your journey.  In fact, for a while, I thought World’s End would never end. It’s a good idea to take a map of the trails with you.  But, the trails are clearly marked and easy to negotiate with some slight inclines.

Undoubtedly, the main attraction for many visitors at World’s End are the views of the Boston skyline.  World’s End affords several views of the skyline and surrounding areas.  From the shoreline views to the views atop the highest point on the top of one of the many views of the rolling, hilly trails, the views are majestic.

World’s End is teeming with wildlife, particularly birds.  They’re very good at camouflaging themselves so you might have to squint to see a few of them.

But, the real gem of my visit was this deer I spotted on my way to Rocky Neck, one of the more secluded areas.  We stood mere feet away from each other staring, until she finally took off.

There are not just an abundant of bird life in the water.  Being a picture perfect summer day with low humidity and a slight breeze and calm waters, it was ideal for many of the boaters, paddlers and other seafaring folks.

This boater wanted some privacy, apparently.

World’s End has many other charming features such as this huge rock and an elevated viewing area for bird watching.

Of course, sometimes the more simpler things can be the prettiest features of the park.  These flowers, tress and views off the water caught my eye.

Some people took advantage of the shore to skim some stones.

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If there is one photo that sums up a trip to World’s End it is this photograph of a hammock with a bicycle next to it.  World’s End is the perfect place to lie out in a hammock with only the sounds of nature to keep you occupied and maybe a good book or your Itunes collection.

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There is also an art exhibit on display until Oct. 31, 2017.  The display was created by Jeppe Hein, an artist based out of Copenhagen and Berlin.  He is known worldwide for his interactive exhibits.  The exhibit is called, “A New End”.  According to the website for the exhibit, Hein wants to invite visitors to reflect and to transform how we view a familiar place like World’s End.

There were dogs-a-plenty at World’s End during my visit.  World’s End is a great place for dogs to play around in since there are many open, grassy areas and, of course, water to frolic around in.

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Casey is a happy, 8 year old English Pointer mix.  He is a rescue.

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Gus is a 2 year old Ridgeback mix.  He was very excited to be at the park!

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Tande is an 8 month old Portuguese Water Dog.  If Tande looks familiar, you may have seen a similarly looking dog on the news.  The President also has the same breed of dog. Tande came all the way from the Odysea Portuguese Water Dogs breeder in Colorado.

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One of my easiest subjects to photograph ever, Bella is a gentle 7 year old Shetland Sheepdog.

I also saw a variety of other dogs playing in the water and running around.

viewsofanemergencyrn was kind enough to nominate me for the One Lovely Blog Award.  Thank you!  I usually don’t post about these awards but I figured I would play along since she was so nice to mention me and I wanted to acknowledge her.  She is a sweet, strong person and a survivor (read her post to see what I mean).

So, the rues are I have to mention 7 random things about me.

  1. I didn’t take up photography seriously until last year
  2. I  love dogs and all animals (big surprise there) but they also seem to love me – the key is to not show fear and be confident and friendly around them (they can sense fear)
  3. I am a pescatarian (I only eat seafood and do not eat meat, primarily)
  4. People often say I bear a strong resemblance to Donnie Wahlberg (but I can’t sing like him)
  5. Although I love dogs, I don’t have one (I have a cat instead)
  6. Until my work schedule got too busy, I had been an active literacy tutor at my local library
  7. I run (and/or walk) 3 miles (at least) a day everyday

The rules say to nominate other bloggers to participate.  But, I’m going to skip that part.  In my experience, people have usually already posted a blog like this in the past and don’t want to do it again, or they don’t participate or they seem to be too busy.  But, thank you, once again for the mention, viewsofanemergencyrn!  I do appreciate you and I look forward to reading more of your posts.  You all should also!

Similar Places I have Visited In New England:

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Webb Memorial State Park (Weymouth, MA)

222

Blue Hills Reservation (Milton, MA)

 

 

 


Mass Audubon Arcadia Wildlife Sanctuary (Easthampton, MA)

Date Visited: June 1, 2016

Location: 127 Combs Rd, Easthampton, MA

Hours:

Trails & Restrooms:
Daily, dawn to dusk

Visitor Center
Mon-Thurs, 9 am – noon
Fri, 9 am – 3:30 pm
Sat, 9 am – noon
Sunday seasonally

Cost:

Members: Free
Nonmembers:
$4 Adults
$3 Children (2-12)
$3 Seniors (65+)

A year long pass for new members cost me $32 for a “family” pass which includes two named adults living in the same household and their children or grandchildren under the age of 18 to free admission.  It usually costs $65.  The levels of passes can range from an individual ($48) to patron ($500).  Check their website or call them for more details.

Parking:  Parking was abundant.  There were some events for children going on when I went and there was room for everyone to park there.

Dog Friendly: No pets are allowed.  So leave Fido at home!

Highlights:  miles of trails, observation tower, lots of wildlife, great blue heron rookery, camps, programs, classes and activities (particularly for children), friendly and helpful staff

Arcadia Wildlife Sanctuary

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Located about 20 minutes north of Springfield, MA and  just over an hour and a half west of Boston, MA, Arcadia Wildlife Sanctuary is teeming with a variety of wildlife.  Some of the wildlife you see may surprise you.

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I had never been so close to a deer, at least not in the wild.  I was close enough to almost pat her.  It was almost unreal to be so close to such a beautiful animal and  not scare her off.

According to the staff member I spoke to about this doe, this particular doe was not an original resident of the sanctuary.  But, due to over development of the area and other factors, she has found her way to the sanctuary.

The 5 mile loop is well marked (remember the yellow path leads back to the visitor center).   There is an observation tower on the main trail (to the right of the trail).  It was pretty shaky but it gave some great views.

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On the walkway to the tower, I made a friend.  This immature redtail hawk is another animal that wasn’t originally at the sanctuary.  But, he or she has made a home there and the bird didn’t seem to shy until I got too close when he or she flew off onto a tree branch.

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Arcadia Wildlife Sanctuary is a beautiful park.  Even if you’re not into photography, birding or looking for wildlife you would still enjoy a scenic hike on the trails.

There are two markers on a pole next to the observation tower displaying the levels of two of the big floods in the area (the floods of 1936 and 1984).

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I was a little disappointed too not see any turtles, frogs or other critters.  But, I saw and heard lots of chipmunks.  Either the last chipmunk in the right hand corner is very long or I should have changed my photo settings.  I thought it looked funny so I kept it!

Audubon sanctuaries are always a safe bet for a fun time at a clean and well maintained park with a lot of wildlife and Arcadia was no different.

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