Creamery Covered Bridge (Brattleboro, VT)

Date Of Visit: August 6, 2017

Location: 9 Guilford St, Brattleboro, VT (Guilford Street off Route 9 west, over Whetstone Brook, VT-13-01)

Cost: Free

Parking: There is a small free parking lot to the left side of the bridge

Hours: Accessible all day, everyday

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Dog Friendly: Yes

Website: Creamery Covered Bridge

Highlights: covered pedestrian bridge

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As I  have been going through my photos and getting ready for next year’s adventures, I have come across quite a few photos from photo shoots from weeks and in some cases months ago that I have not posted yet.  So, in my effort to play catch up, you may see some photos in my posts from places I have visited during the summer and early fall.  It will be nice to see what green leaves and pretty flowers look like since they are no longer with us.  O.K, so next year’s there’s another resolution for next year: get more organized!

Vermont is known for maple syrup, snow and more snow.  Oh, and they also have a few covered bridges.

In fact, covered bridges are a staple of Vermont.  They have the most covered bridges per square mile than any other state in the country.

There are over 100 (109 to be exact) covered bridges in Vermont.  But the Creamery Covered Bridge in Brattleboro, VT,  is no ordinary bridge.

The Creamery Bridge so called after the old Brattleboro Creamery which stood beyond the bridge is Brattleboro’s last surviving 19th-century covered bridge.

The bridge, which only allows pedestrian traffic, is 80 feet long and 19 feet wide, with a 15-foot roadway; the attached sidewalk is 5.5 feet wide.

The sidewalk attached to side of the bridge offers some pretty views of the Whetstone Brook below.

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The bridge was built from spruce lumber 1879 and it had been used be vehicles until it was closed to vehicle traffic in 2010.  It now only allows traffic from cyclists, joggers and other pedestrians.  The sidewalk was added in 1920.

To the side of the bridge there is an area with benches where you can sit and admire the bridge.

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This marker was located near the bridge.  I could not find any reference to it on the internet.  If anyone has any information on it, I would appreciate it if you left a comment about it.  Without making too many assumptions, it appears as though it may have been dedicated to someone who was a covered bridge enthusiast.

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Below is a video of the inside of the bridge.

About New England Nomad

Hi I'm Wayne. Welcome to my blog. I am a true New Englander through and through. I love everything about New England. I especially love discovering new places in New England and sharing my experiences with everyone. I tend to focus on the more unique and lesser known places and things in New England on my blog. Oh yeah, and I love dogs. I always try to include at least one dog in each of my blog posts. I discovered my love of photography a couple of years ago. I know, I got a late start. Now, I photograph anything that seems out of the ordinary, interesting, beautiful and/or unique. And I have noticed how every person, place or thing I photograph has a story behind it or him or her. I don't just photograph things or people or animals. I try to get their background, history or as much information as possible to give the subject more context and meaning. It's interesting how one simple photograph can evoke so much. I am currently using a Nikon D3200 "beginner's camera." Even though there are better cameras on the market, and I will upgrade some time, I love how it functions (usually) and it has served me well. The great thing about my blog is you don't have to be from New England, or even like New England to like my blog (although I've never met anyone who doesn't). All you have to like is to see and read about new or interesting places and things. Hopefully, you'll join me on my many adventures in New England! View all posts by New England Nomad

17 responses to “Creamery Covered Bridge (Brattleboro, VT)

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