Ogunquit Dog Park (Ogunquit, ME)

Date Of Visit: August 25, 2017

Location: Spring Hill Rd, off Berwick Rd., Ogunquit, ME

Hours: Open daily, dusk to dawn

Parking: There is room for about 4 or 5 cars by the entrance with additional parking on the side of the road to the park.

Handicapped Accessible: Yes

Highlights: spacious park for dogs to play, kiddie pool, balls to throw, seating

Tips:

  • The park is located on a side road (Spring Hill Rd) with no other businesses or buildings, so there is ample parking on the side of the road if you can’t find a spot in the main parking area
  • I had some difficulty finding the park.  The website says to use this in your GPS as the address: 323 Berwick Rd. Ogunquit.  You will see a sign on Berwick Rd for the park.  It is the turn after Meadow Lane if you are coming from the east.  Or, if you are coming from the west and you see Meadow Lane you have gone too far.

Website: Ogunquit Dog Park

 

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Since its opening on January 15, 2011, Ogunquit Dog Park has been a play land for dogs of all breeds.  But, it may be it’s hidden history and a very special dog that makes the park so special.

Ogunquit Dog Park is spacious enough for lots of dogs to run around and play.  There are also benches and chairs to sit at while your dog enjoys the park.  And, of course, trees.

The one acre park is has a pool, shed, hydrant and tennis balls to throw to the dogs.  The shed at the entrance was built by the students at the local vocational high school in Wells, Maine.  The wood shavings on the ground give the park a pretty look.

Perhaps the highlight of the park is the memorial to Perkins, and all beloved dogs, that is set up inconspicuously near the center of the park by a tree.

IMG_0631 After Perkins, a golden retriever who used to frequent the park, passed away on Monday, October 26th, 2015, the pet’s guardian (Martin) and some other people came together to set up a memorial for him.  Perkins, whose “nana” worked in Perkins Cove, used to act as the “greeter” standing outside the door greeting customers and being cute.  Eventually, Perkins’ dad would decided to look into opening the park.  And, from there, the idea began to snowball.    There is also a note from the dog’s guardian and some photos of him.  I wish I could have met him.

For safety purposes during entry and exit of the park, the dog park is fully fenced with double gates.  There is a separate section for small dogs and a small trail to thee side of the park. Water that is piped in from a 3 year old, 600 foot deep well at the Transfer Station is available from April 1 to mid-November.  Also, the area is sprayed for ticks every 2 months with an organic solution.

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There was a steady flow of four legged visitors during my visit.

Ruby is a 7 year old Wheaton Terrier.  She also played an instrumental role in the opening of the dog park as she helped pull the yellow ribbon on the gate of the park to formally open the park.

Dice is an 11 month old Husky and Blue Heeler.  If you look closely, you may notice he has one brown eye and one blue eye.

Drisky is 7 months old.  Love his white socks!

Delaney is a mixed breed from South Carolina.

Rudy, the brown and white dog in the photos above, is a 9 year old Brittany Spaniel.

Today’s New England related link of the day is a poem dedicated to Perkins written by Richard W. Perkins:

Farewell Dear Friends

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About New England Nomad

Hi I'm Wayne. Welcome to my blog. I am a true New Englander through and through. I love everything about New England. I especially love discovering new places in New England and sharing my experiences with everyone. I tend to focus on the more unique and lesser known places and things in New England on my blog. Oh yeah, and I love dogs. I always try to include at least one dog in each of my blog posts. I discovered my love of photography a couple of years ago. I know, I got a late start. Now, I photograph anything that seems out of the ordinary, interesting, beautiful and/or unique. And I have noticed how every person, place or thing I photograph has a story behind it or him or her. I don't just photograph things or people or animals. I try to get their background, history or as much information as possible to give the subject more context and meaning. It's interesting how one simple photograph can evoke so much. I am currently using a Nikon D3200 "beginner's camera." Even though there are better cameras on the market, and I will upgrade some time, I love how it functions (usually) and it has served me well. The great thing about my blog is you don't have to be from New England, or even like New England to like my blog (although I've never met anyone who doesn't). All you have to like is to see and read about new or interesting places and things. Hopefully, you'll join me on my many adventures in New England! View all posts by New England Nomad

6 responses to “Ogunquit Dog Park (Ogunquit, ME)

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